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Local News and then some

In an earlier column I wrote about how living in Yachats during the summer is like being in a marathon. The season starts slow then moves along at a brisk pace with lots of visitors in the area and lots of people passing through town.

There is action in the air and the energy is apparent. Sounds of activity at night, people frolicking on the beach, crowds in the restaurants and pubs and lines at the grocery store. Then magically after Labor Day "The Change" occurs. For those of us who live in Yachats it's a given that Labor Day is the end of the summer vacation season.

However for newcomers to the area the sudden quiet and lack of people can seem odd and perhaps a bit disconcerting. Instead of hearing traffic on the highway the sound of the ocean becomes the noise of the night. You can find a table at a restaurant with ease and shopping is a breeze.

Perhaps it's my imagination but things suddenly slow down. It's as if someone shifted gears and we're all moving a bit slower. On the other hand after Labor Day the number of large RV's migrating towards the south increases but that is usually during daylight hours. When the kids go back to school the older folks come out to play!

Occasionally we are doubly lucky after Labor Day because the weather stays nice. We had a small storm but since Labor Day it's been great to be outside in the evening enjoying the scenery and quiet calm. The weekends still have a plethora of activities for locals and visitors alike like the Sunday Farmers Market at the Yachats Commons and this year there have been a lot of folks from the valley visiting and enjoying things.

In reality the time right after Labor Day is a wonderful time to take a vacation in Yachats. The crowds are gone, the weather is Indian Summer like and you never have to experience the hustle of summer visitors who are in a hurry to enjoy their time off and sometimes move at the speed of light and act like they are in the center of an urban city with a lots of hustle and bustle.

Now I'm suggesting the "The Change" is taking place in Yachats and I'd also suggest if you like the serenity and beauty of the what they call the Gem of the Oregon Coast now is a great time to come visit Yachats!!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Here Ye, Here Ye, read all about it!!

While Robert Murdoch's massive conglomerate the News Corporation is going through troubling and tumultuous times and Newspapers worldwide are fighting to stay alive against the onslaught of electronic news, on the western edge of this country, the Central Coast of Oregon, an intrepid individual in the village of Yachats is taking a bold step and entering the publishing world via a newspaper; The Yachats Gazette!

This comes at a time when small towns and villages have often been left with out a true local newspaper. As media corporations trim budgets and thin staff to stay competitive, some small papers have fallen by the wayside. However, the other day a source of mine informed me that Yachats, who once had a great local paper "Big Mouth", will no longer be without a voice of the people.

Word had it that the first issue of The Yachats Gazette was now available. Well I snooped around a bit and finally found a copy of the first issue of The Yachats Gazette and arranged a conversation with the publisher via email. Here is what the publisher Allen Taylor had to say about his paper.

"The Yachats Gazette, as it is properly called, is available at the Green Salmon and Mari's Books in Yachats. I just decided to start the newspaper--I didn't really have any underlying idea. I'm definitely not going to expand it this year. But maybe in March I might double the page size to include a whole new section of articles, which would be "Restaurants and Good Eats." Yes, it's a year-round monthly paper. This is my first venture into this field or any field. I haven't started anything, from lemonade stands to insurance companies.

The newspaper is not available outside of Yachats, but it is available on-line: http://yachatsgazette.blogspot.com . It is a free paper, not a subscription paper".

Certainly Allen Taylor has a game plan and on the mast head of the paper he lists in addition to himself, Eddie Taylor; Editorial Assistant and Transportation, and Heather Taylor; Graphic Design, and for advertisement and to be featured please contact Allen Taylor at aboyandhistrains@gmail.com.

Many papers have started small in small villages and towns and The Yachats Gazette just may be one of those small papers that grows or maybe it will always remain a small paper but nevertheless it's a local paper and when reading it one can tell it’s a paper that is put together with heart and soul. I salute Allen Taylor in this exciting chapter of his life and hope you all will get a chance to see his work in print!

Here Ye, Here Ye, to read all about it grab a copy of The Yachats Gazette!

Incidentally Allen Taylor is eight years old!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net..


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: feltch
Go Fly A Kite.

If someone came up to you and told you to "go fly a Kite" you might wonder if it was in jest or were they telling you to get lost. Or perhaps they just meant for you to ask them why? At any rate in Yachats you're going to be hearing "Go Fly A Kite" quite a bit for the next several weeks. No they haven't totally lost it in Yachats although some folks swear that many Yachatians have lost it and are still waiting for the next La De Dah Parade to roll through town!

Seriously though, many years ago Yachats had a Kite Festival every year and the skies would be filled with colorful kites swooping, diving and soaring over the river and ocean. The beach at the mouth of the Yachats river is a perfect spot for kite flying, smooth, long and flat it's a natural kite launching pad.

Well, thanks to Wyatt Flechner and Gretchen Hetzler Yachats once again is going to have a Kite Festival. It's going to be held on Sept 3rd and is more than just a Kite Festival. Wyatt and Gretchen are currently holding a fun raising drive to defray the cost of the festival and bringing special guest Connor Doran. Here is what they have to say about the Festival.

"Connor Doran is a young man with a kite. He also has had epilepsy since he was four years old. Flying kites has given him control over his life and incredible self-confidence. In 2010, he won the wild card slot in an audition for America’s Got Talent. On the stage, indoors, relying on the movement of the kite to provide the lift, Connor led his kite in swoops and leaps, as if they were dancing together. The judges voted unanimously to send him to the finals in Las Vegas.

(You can see Connor’s performance on YouTube-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjjMHaQyk9k&feature=youtu.be ) Connor and his enthusiastically supportive mother, Amy, will attend Sky Candy, the Yachats kite festival to be held on Saturday, September 3. The event, sponsored by Wyatt Feichtner, proprietor of the Yachats Mercantile, is free and open to everyone. This family fun event renews an old tradition of Yachats kite festivals, with kite displays, contests and instruction on how to fly a kite.

For more information about Sky Candy, visit www.GoYachats.com/Events . The organizers are seeking donations to help Connor with his fund raising for college.

If you would like to help bring this inspiring young man and his kites to Yachats, please send your donations to the Yachats Mercantile, P.O. Box 394, Yachats OR 97498. At press time they have approximately $600 towards the goal of at least $1000 and just decided to put up some portable toilets at the beach in the day of the event so that adds an additional $130 to the cost.You can also contribute via PayPal; the account is yachatskitefest@gmail.com . Look for donation jars around Yachats. If you want more information about Connor and the kite festival, call Wyatt at 541 547 3060.

And be sure to attend Sky Candy for lots of fun activities, including Connor’s mesmerizing kite flying performance. Go fly a kite!" So if you hear someone in Yachats tell you to go fly a kite, you will know what they mean by that!

Visit Yachats and enjoy Sky Candy along with the rest of us! to reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Having lived in Yachats for many years I can tell when summer is approaching even though the weather hasn’t been what you’d call summerish but trust me it is on its way. How do I know not being a weatherman or an omnipresent wise man? Watch the Yachatians and you too will know summer is on its way. One of the first signs is the appearance of the Gaden Shartse Monks Sacred Earth Healing Arts of Tibet tour that annually visits Yachats and the Green Salmon and Yachats Commons at the beginning of summer and fills a week with music and interesting activities and events.

Another sign is the red, white, and blue bunting that begins to appear on various businesses. Of course the visitors to Yachats begin to arrive and gradually the market, the restaurants and pubs, shops and motels begin to get busier, and along with that you can tell by the amount of traffic up and down highway 101. In fact the local joke is that when summer hits you can only turn right onto the highway since it would take all day to cross the road!

Another sign of summer and one of my favorites is the demeanor of the folks that are working the various businesses. A general cheerfulness permeates the air and smiles abound. Another sign is large groups of people walking through town and big gatherings on the beach at the mouth of the Yachats River. Often it will be several families who get together for their summer vacations or groups of friends from various places who rendezvous in Yachats to enjoy the area, the beaches, and the nearby attractions like Cape Perpetua. They hike, bike, BBQ and generally have a blast!

Naturally when July hits the buildup to the Yachats 4th of July celebration begins. This year the Lions are going to have a breakfast prior to the La De Dah parade and following a day full of food stands, BBQ's and general frivolity the celebrated Yachats 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular takes place at dusk! After the fireworks show it’s amazing to watch the tail lights of the all the cars leaving Yachats in both directions. It's a glittery parade that sparkles well into the night. So I can feel it in my bones, summer is banging on the door, now if the wonderful Mother Nature will open the door and throw in some sunshine we'll all be feeling summer in Yachats!

Come for a visit, I'm sure you'll have a good time along with the rest of us!!

Send E-Mail to Rick Schultze

Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
Here on the Central Oregon Coast the months of May,June and July all feature parades that celebrate the city, town or village that is hosting them. Some of them like the Rhody Days parade in Florence have been going on for over a century. Another one, Beachcomber's Days, in Waldport started in 1957 and the La De Da Parade in Yachats is relatively new, it's in it fifteenth year, but they are all unique events and part of what makes Spring and Summer a fun time for local residents and visitors as well. Like they say "everyone loves a parade".

I grew up in Portland and was captivated by the Rose Festival Parade from the first time I remember seeing it and ever since then I've enjoyed parades and very much appreciate the time and effort parade organizers put into them. I've been to many Rhody Days parades and am always impressed at the way Florence supports it. I've also been to many Beachcombers Days parades and in fact was in that one twice when working for the Waldport newspaper. It was fun, and that parade is also well supported!

However, one parade that is completely different and really a lot of fun is the La De Da parade in Yachats. Just the name alone implies the attitude of the parade! La De Da, oh well!! So with that sort of mentality the good citizens of Yachats put their collective heads together and come up with some very original floats, entrants, and celebrities to walk, dance and prance the route from the Yachats Commons to the Yachats Post Office.

A rather short route that winds along the ocean road which is lines with spectators eager to see the synchronized umbrella team, the troupe of belly dancers, the fire trucks and ocean rescue teams, the kids from the Yachats Youth and Family Activities marching. And there are other unique entrants in this small but colorful parade that literately fills the village up with residents and visitors.

The celebrities are usually the Mayor and City Council members riding on a vintage manure spreader pulled by a sturdy tractor. This always is a big crowd pleaser and again points out that this parade is far from serious! It's a great example of tongue in cheek parade humor and to add to the frivolity and excitement of the parade, is that parade day is on the 4th of July and the outstanding Yachats fireworks show over the bay and ocean follows the parade at dusk!

So after you've seen the Rhody Days and Beachcombers Days parades come to Yachats and enjoy a day of pure La De Da!!

To reach Rick Schultze; email yarick@pioneer.net.

Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

In the first Changing Faces of Yachats column, I mentioned many buildings and establishments that have changed over time. Since then I've received many responses from Yachatians about other places and people I didn't mention. So hopefully this will add a bit more to the Changing Faces of Yachats. I'd like to thank Vicky Prince, Su Carey, Wyatt Feichtner, and Jim King in Yachats for sharing their memories of days gone by as well as others I’ve heard from at the post office, grocery store and Yachats Commons.

Of course being a small village change is always noticed and these folks have seen many, some from their childhoods, some from the time they moved here, and some from folks that have visited Yachats over the years. One of the Yachatians who expressed her memories is Vicky Prince the proprietor of Ya-hots Video, formerly known as “In Sheep's Clothing Video”. In fact her shop was moved from it's present location across Hwy 101 to what is now Mari's Bookstore and back again next to Shirley's Gift Shop prior to Prince taking it over from Michele Wheatland and changing the name and inventory. Prince’s memory goes back to the days when a Dairy Queen, then Leroy's Blue Whale, then The Coffee Merchant, and finally The Oak Barrel Gift Shop occupied the building what is now the popular Green Salmon. Here’s Vicky "Well - there was a bait shop where the post office is now. Shirley's and Bert's "Bait & Tackle" and a clothing store were where Judith's, Mari's and Turtle Island are now and On the Rise Bakery where Planet Yachats is now...and Dave's Deli and Town Center Cafe were in the space where the Chamber is now...and the barracks, roller rink, D&D grocery were where the Lion's thrift shop is now. lol - getting me thinking about it may not have been the best idea. I keep thinking of more”.

Here is Wyatt Feichtner who recently became proprietor of the Yachats Mercantile taking over from Ned and Nancy Hargas who purchased the Mercantile in 1987, opened it in 1988 and ran it until Wyatt stepped in. “My name is Wyatt Feichtner. I was born in the Lincoln city hospital in '78, but my home town was Yachats. I just became proprietor of the mercantile so I think that fits into the changing faces.

I remember renting movies at the Laundromat next door when I was a kid." Another Yachatian Jim King has this to say “Toppers was a gas station up through the 80's... I actually pumped gas there for a summer. And the Ona building was also a hotel and burnt and was rebuilt then as Red's Annex- I think. This place has changed much since I was 5 years old!!! Oh well, so have I!"

As well as the physical changes that have and continue to happen in Yachats there have been some other changes that have happened like the time when up on the hill south of Yachats there was a old Civilian Conservation Corps horse stable made of concrete and a small trailer house that became home to a short lived Commune. Eventually the Commune collapsed due to lack of interest but when the originators of the Commune abandoned it they left a Yack which wandered down to the Yachats Inn and three horses that were rescued the Sheriffs Department. The three originators were eventually apprehended in Yreka Calif and given citations and are no longer allowed to own animals in the State of Oregon. Su Carey of Yachats added this “There was a bowling alley turned grocery store when we moved here, behind the now wine shop. Our best friends lived in the wine shop complex and had 2 children there. I also always thought there should be a cottage photo history, but it's almost too late for that now since they are almost all remodeled.” She also has a good memory about one of Yachats more famous residents who for sometime was the Produce Man at Clarks Market. “I remember Brian Hyland. Hi real name was Francis Hyland! He was a 1960's music icon, and our very own produce man in 1980-1985ish. Itsy bitsy Poka dot bikini was his big hit. I just looked him up, he is back in the swing of things, on U-tube, looking good. He lived on Ocean Drive with his girlfriend, at her families’ beach house. He said it was an escape from California for a while, a time to re-group”.

As you can see, like everywhere else Yachats continues to change and evolve and there are fond memories and some not so fond but if it seems like nothing is going on in little Yachats, think again!!

To reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net

Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

In a village like Yachats there are always changes but when it comes to building new buildings those changes tend to be toward remodeling or renovating existing buildings. Since downtown Yachats is a rather small portion of the whole village there isn't really a lot of room for new buildings to be erected. So, many of the existing structures in Yachats have served a variety occupants. The Yachats Commons for example used to be the local school. Now it is the home of city hall and is used by many for events such as the Arts and Crafts fairs, the home of dramatic, comedic, and musical events. It also houses the Yachts Youth and Family Activities Programs and a pavilion in back that is also used for community picnics, a kitchen for the annual Lions Fish Fry, and a shelter adjacent to the play area for those who enjoy the playground. The Commons has evolved with time and keep up with the needs of the Village.

Another building that has changed with time is the Historic Drift Inn & Pub. The now popular spot was at one time a store with meat lockers where hunters would bring their bounty. Later it became the legendary Lester's Tavern or Lester's as the regulars called it. A few years ago the building was completely renovated and is now a beautiful and welcoming building. It's a far cry from what it was originally and like they say "if these walls could talk" there would be some fantastic tales. Another building that was completely renovated and remodeled is Ona Restaurants. This building used to be Red's Annex back in the fifties then it became The Crab and Chowder house then the River House. There have been several different operators and owners but it remains a Yachats favorite.

The Yachats Underground Pub and Grub was at one time the Pie and Kite Shop then The Yankee Clipper. With each change the building took on a new life and personality. Luna Seafood restaurant and fish market at one time was a Mexican restaurant and Toppers in the same complex actually was the site of a gas station in the forties.

Of course the now shuttered Landmark Restaurant and Lounge was originally Beulah’s and known for its famous Chicken and Dumplings and Tomato Preserves. Beulah herself was quite a Yachats character of days gone by.

Another building that has changed a few times is where Prudential Real Estate recently was located. At one time that building was the Bank of The West and was actually robbed! Of course the robber was apprehended since there are only a couple of ways to get out of Yachats, go North or go South on Highway 101.

The building on the corner of Highway 101 and Third Street was once the post office, then Toad Hall, then Florence's By Sea, and it was a wine shop for awhile. Then it was a gift shop and the home of Mr. Bills and a toy store. Now it's Sunshine Salon.

However as Yachats continues to change here and there some things remain the same like The Adobe, The Dublin House, The Silver Surf, The Ya’tel and Yachats Village Inn. Of course all of those establishments have undergone renovations and improvements but continue to be the same familiar landmarks to those who visit Yachats and for those who live in Yachats.

Yachats may be small and often called a village but one can hardly say it's a sleep little village for in Yachats change is a constant!

To reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

As Oregon's Spring Break for students wound down other Spring Breakers from other states continue to visit and enjoy Yachats. They have been hardy visitors braving the rain, wind and other Oregon weather experiences and on those days when the sun peaked through for even a moment they hit the beaches and believe it or not flew kites!

There were Arts and Craft fairs, Radio show re-enactments, and musical guests in several of Yachats favorite night spots and in general a good time was had by all! Seeing all these folks bopping around Yachats reminded me of the many characters that have populated Yachats over the years and the current cast of characters that continue to keep it interesting to be here.


At one time there were some of the "original" characters who literally built the town, ran what is now the Ladies club as a dance hall, and remodeled the Yachats Plaza from small cabins turning them to shops and a grocery store. Some of them build the Lions Hall, others worked on getting television reception to the area along with other amenities. Lester ran the old Drift Inn Tavern for the locals who had no place to go and even offered bar tabs to the regulars. After Lester passed away there was a sign on the tavern window asking those who had outstanding tabs to please forward the money to his daughter.

Legend has it everyone paid and I don't doubt that many did. Yachats is that kind of place; people know and respect one another. However, that cast of characters moved on and for awhile there were several new characters that added to the spice of life in Yachats. One was "Jersey Jerry" the head chief at the Adobe. Not only did he oversee the fine restaurant operation there, he could regale one with tales of back east, his fondness for baseball and The Pittsburgh Pirates. He is no long in Yachats but remains in Oregon, no doubt spinning some more good tales. Another colorful character was “Jungle George”; a retired circus animal trainer.

He too had some stories of traveling the world and meeting famous folks like the Pope. Jungle has photos that show circus life at it's finest! Then there was “Lucky Larry” who managed to get into several scrapes yet always managed to walk away ahead of the game. And not to be forgotten was “Ray” who looked like he was one of the original Smith Brothers of cough drop fame and who could be seen featured in the local papers frequently.

Today of course there are still many colorful characters in Yachats and many colorful characters come to visit in Yachats, but the two names that arouse my curiosity these days are "The Clock Guy" and “Dan the Iron Man". I have yet to research these two gentlemen but that's part of being a Yachatian; there is much more to find out about why Yachats is never dull... You too can find out why dullness isn't synonymous with Yachats; just come visit!!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Many cities, towns and villages have streets that have nicknames. A few are; “The Great White Way” in New York, or “The Loop” in Chicago, or “The Strip” in Las Vegas. West Sacramento has “West Cap” and Newport the “Bay Front”. Even Yachats has a street with a nickname; in fact it has two nicknames depending on who you talk to. The first nickname is “Historic 3'rd Street”, the other “Hysterical 3'rd Street”.

Of course in Yachats the real name of the street is 3'rd Street and because it’s dissected by Highway 101 it’s either East 3'rd Street or West 3'rd Street. It’s actually a very interesting street and while it does have some serious historical elements, it also has some whimsical elements. Where else would you find a Toad, a Turtle, a Virgin, a church, a club and a tattoo studio all within three blocks of one another and co-existing in harmony?

I’ll clear it up a bit; located on 3'rd Street are two shops; The Antique Virgin and Toad Hall. Across the street from Toad Hall is The Yachats Ladies Club and across from that is The Little Log Church while Turtle Island Tattoo a state licensed appointment-only studio is down the street just a half a block from the ocean.

The Antique Virgin is the newest of the 3'rd street residents while the Yachats Ladies Club has been in existence for 80 years, The Little Log Church was built in 1931, Toad Hall just celebrated their 23'rd year, and Bonnie Jean from Turtle Island Tattoo has been practicing her trade since 1985.

When you consider that there have been hundreds of Weddings preformed at the Little Log Church and many pot-lucks, craft fairs, concerts and receptions at The Yachats Ladies Club, 3'rd street sees it’s fair share of visitors and locals alike attending something or browsing the shops or visiting Turtle Island all at the same time you can see how the names Historical and Hysterical sometimes blend. When there is a wedding at the church, a rummage sale at the Ladies Club, a book signing at Toad Hall, a sale in progress at The Antique Virgin and appointments to fill at Turtle Island there are a lot of folks visiting 3'rd Street. They are entering establishments that are full of History or maybe they are Hysterically searching for a good buy at the rummage sale or a “must have” item from one of the shops. Either way, a visit to 3'rd Street in Yachats will be a visit to remember!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well here we are in the often talked about and sometimes dreaded "Off Season". Given our location here on the Central Oregon Coast "Off Season" means that the number of visitors to the areas is much lower than during "The Season" when the motels, restaurants, shops, beaches and other natural attractions are bustling with visitors from far and wide enjoying themselves and the local residents that deal with the visitors are enjoying themselves as well.

So the "Off Season" for many residents including those in the Village of Yachats becomes a time to take a look back at the last "In Season" and review the way it went and try to make any adjustments they feel will help better the next "In Season". They realize that the window of opportunity to maximize the benefits from visitors opens and closes rather quickly sometimes.

Today that window is somewhat smaller because of the overall economic situation so it has become even more important to recognize the positive side of visitors to the area and providing the best scenarios possible. Of course being winter dictates what sort of outdoor improvements establishments can undertake but winter also allows for various business and eateries to fine tune their inventory’s, make new additions to existing programs, work on new publicity approaches, and balance out employees schedules.

Many times as well some business will take a short hiatus in order to refresh themselves and the overall concept of their business. But besides the commercial aspects of the "Off Season" the non-commercial or day to day approach to this time of year can to a great time to reflect on what you did over last seasons busy time.

How you dealt with increased traffic not only in your town or village but the traffic that can quickly fill Highway 101 up and down the coast. I know folks that use this time to stock up on items they will need throughout the year. Non perishable items but items necessary to cut down on the number of times you have to run off to Newport or Florence to hit the "big" stores. And then there are the fortunate ones who have scheduled a bit of "get away" time to do a bit of traveling to warmer, dryer climates for a bit of sunshine rehabilitation.

Then when you've exhausted all your excuses you can sit down and fill out this years income tax. As sure as the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, the "Off Season" around here always includes tax time and time to project and balance budgets. So while the quiet is nice, relaxing and peaceful, most of us start looking forward to the next "In Season".

Enjoy this "Off Season" time of year and remember how tranquil it is when Summer rolls around and we are running all over the place on a daily basis..

To reach Rick Schultze: email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

When you write observational columns like I do you kind of have to try and the keep the column timely. Thus if this column makes the paper today it’s timely because it’s about The Super Bowl and Super Sunday!

This year marks the 45^th year the Super Bowl has been played. Imagine that back when the first Super Bowl was played the organizers had insurance coverage to cover the cost if they didn’t sell enough tickets. Wow, have times changed. Nowadays the Super Bowl is America’s favorite non-sanctioned holiday. Talk about holiday specials; cast an eye on all the Super Bowl specials from food and beverage specials to special sales held in Malls across the country for those, mostly wives and girlfriends that would rather shop than watch the game.

Yes, the Super Bowl is a major economic entity that impacts commerce in America and around the world as well. The growth of the Super Bowl popularity has been helped along tremendously by the media. From print to electronic the Super Bowl is perfect for non-stop coverage. The teams of reporters and commentators that descend on the site of the game, this year Cowboy Stadium in Arlington Texas, for a full week of non-stop coverage. There is the NFL Network, ESPN, Fox who is covering the actual game and every major newspaper in this country plus teams of foreign reporters who poke, ask, and pry into the lives of players, coaches, and owners.

When they tire of asking those folks questions they turn to the fans and start asking them their predictions. Of course they also have direct connections to the odds makers in Las Vegas who juggle the odds up to game time. Yes, there will be a fair amount of gambling going on Super Bowl Sunday!

In years past I’ve estimated the amount of beer, soda, guacamole, chili, chips, hot wings, vegetables for dipping and a plethora of other game day delights to be sampled with pleasure, but this year I’m just going to say that there will be massive amounts of the above mentioned items consumed. What fun, eat, drink, and watch football with friends at the many parties held everywhere. In fact I spoke with a nurse yesterday in Yachats who told me that she wasn’t a big football fan but she and her husband always hold a Super Bowl party and she is really looking forward to this years match up between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Green Bay Packers..

I am a big football fan so you know I’m ready to party and cheer but I can’t divulge who I want to win, don’t want to jinx ‘em.

So join me in enjoying Super Bowl Sunday and may your favorite team come away victorious and you come away full and happy! Cheers…..

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I’m pretty sure everyone around here is very tired, stressed and worn out from the tragic story of the shooting of Lincoln City Police Officer Steven Dodds and the subsequent escape of the alleged shooter David Anthony Durham.

This is an odd example of a person and a dog who because they were just doing what they do; Officer Dodd on patrol, and Huckleberry the dog riding in his masters SUV, ended up being lead characters in a drama that has national ramifications and has turned Waldport into a major command center for a massive show of law enforcement officers from all over the state of Oregon.

One other character in this drama, Durham, turned the normally quiet and peaceful Coastal town into a virtual no mans land with check points at the entrances to the Bayshore and Sandpiper neighborhoods. One man, allegedly in a radical mental state, caused anguish, fear, and untold taxpayer expense. Mind you, it was just one man who started this awful chain of events. Besides being a horrific act of shooting a man, this act was an extremely selfish act. I mean, what about all the Bayshore residents who had their homes searched, their daily routines destroyed and the school kids that were forced to either stay in the safety of their homes or be locked down while attending school?

What about the parents that had to change their schedules to accommodate the school bus changes? What about the school teachers at the Waldport schools and Angell Job Corps that suddenly had more on their minds than merely following their daily curriculum instructions? And, what about the students at Angell Job Corps that weren’t allowed to go to the gym after school for security reasons. Then of course are the elderly residents who besides often being homebound are scared to death of a gunman on the loose in their midst.

That’s a lot of stuff that no one expected to happen let alone in their own little peaceful part of the world. Sure because we live in rural areas we don’t expect things like this to happen but it did and the response from Law Enforcement and Media has been quick and overwhelming. All because of one disturbed man. Again all I can say is; selfish...

As I write this I’m listening to a press conference with Officer Dodd’s surgeons who say they believe he will fully recover which is wonderful and that Huckleberry the dog is being treated for a injured leg and is in the Lincoln County Animal shelter awaiting transportation back to Portland.

For that we should be thankful, the two really innocent characters in this nightmarish play are safe, but the villain is still at large and I don’t think he will be greeted with smiling faces when caught.

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Yes, it’s that time to get started again. Started on what you might ask?

The answer would be getting started on another book. I’m sure I’m not alone with this thought since there are many writers here on the Central Oregon Coast but this is the time of year to sit down and pound out words on the keyboard. One of the reasons I moved to Yachats years ago was to settle in a small coastal village that was conducive towards the creative side of life. It’s a place where the population is very varied with a plethora of folks with some sort of creative talent and ideas. There are writers, poets, actors, artists, chefs, musicians, activists, farmers, environmentalists, teachers, theologians, youth activities co-ordinators, yoga instructors, web designers, tutors and others. In a nutshell for a small village Yachats is quite eclectic and a great place to work on your projects with the support of friends and neighbors. This isn’t to say other places on the coast aren’t like this but in my travels Yachats is one of a kind.

So with all good intentions I shall begin book number two in the place that I think is the right place to be. Of course with all that said I’ve got to do what my father always told me was the hardest thing to do “keep your butt in the chair and write”. By that he meant stick with the project and don’t let outside distractions keep you from completing the project. In summer the distractions are plentiful and I can very easily be swayed away from the chair and keyboard. I mean how you can pass up a beautiful summer afternoon walking the beach, stopping by one of the many restaurants for a beverage, and taking to friends who come over to the coast to get away from the urban rat race. In the fall the onslaught of football, my favorite sport, on television several days a week concentrating on stringing words and paragraphs together pales in comparison to the excitement of the last two minutes of a close football game. So now as winter sets in and in a couple of weeks the football season ends I am going to take that deep breath and jump into writing with few distractions to sway me. That’s not to say there won’t be distractions due to nature and other elements of daily life but overall it’s much easier to stay put when it’s rainy, windy, and gloomy outside. You can develop a routine that is workable and it’s actually fun to listen to the storms rock and rolling and diving into writing. I remember the late Ken Kesey telling a group of us once at a writer’s conference in Yachats, “don’t sit there and look at the ocean because you won’t get anything done. Work in a room with no window”. Well folks I’m in a room with no window and my keyboard is about to start humming again!!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Over the years we coastal residents have seen or heard about the local old-timers that were, and still are, instrumental and important to our towns and villages. I know that Florence, Mapleton, Waldport, Seal Rock, Ten Mile and Yachats all have folks that have been residents there for many years. Sadly time has taken its toll and a number of those folks are no longer with us. In Yachats we’ve lost several over this last year but there are some that are still rolling right along. A prime example of that is Yachats resident Lester Hall. This coming January 29^th Lester is celebrating his 100^th birthday at the Moose Hall in Waldport. The town he moved to from Agnes Oregon in 1929. He graduated from high school there, married his high school sweetheart Doris and they had 3 children; John, Shari and Terry. Lester worked for his brother Claude as a butcher at Hall’s IGA in Waldport for several years before he and Doris bought a dairy farm up the Yachats River. He later bought and sold several others properties on the river. Doris passed away in 1992. Lester is still actively operating to beef cattle ranches on the Yachats River that he has been running for the past 68 years.

There isn’t anything quite like running into some of these old times, pulling up and chair and listing to the living history lessons they can give you. At one time in Yachats I remember listening to and old-timer telling me how the house he was born in and grew up in was a few yards away from the original Oregon Trail. Other Yachats stories were about the folks who hunted and fished to barter for daily living provisions and the one man saw mill up the Yachats River road. These folks are treasures that will never be replaced. The lifestyles of their youth were nothing like the lifestyles of today’s youth. That’s not a sight at today’s youth but just a fact. Today most young folks have more capability to communicate with one another by phone or computers in an instant that the old-timers could have ever envisioned. So today in these towns and villages we have an interesting mix of young and old, and sure urban areas have that too, but because we small and tend to know most folks in town we can really get to know the local old-timers and take advantage of what they can pass on to us. I think some of my favorite times are when I’ve been to a party or potluck with a mix of old-timers and new-timers breaking bread together and swapping tales. Oh, if only the hills could talk, we’d really hear some great stories of the old Wild West!!

To reach Rick Schultze: email yarick@pioneer.net.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well the Christmas decorations are down and the remnants of the New Years Eve festivities have been disposed of and now here comes the quiet of winter settling in along the Central Oregon Coast. I don’t mean quiet in the sense of calm weather because you know there will be some wild and woolly storms that will hit us furthering the Coasts reputation of a “storm watchers paradise”. No, I mean the quiet of not having people flocking to the coast for the Holidays, family and friends from all over convening in our towns and villages making them into Party Centrals at the drop of the hat.

Now we are in the process of letting the dust settle from the festivities and going into the local markets and recognizing many of the shoppers as our neighbors and co-workers, not total strangers. The nights are usually dark and not particularly inviting for those who like to take a leisurely stroll on the beach. No, it’s more like the reflective time of year. Sure there are many who have resolutions to get healthier, eat better and get into shape and for we that write this slow time is a good time to hit the keyboards in quiet concentration with very little to distract us from writing. It’s the lack of the fever pitch of Holidays and year end spectaculars that make this time of year on the Coast very appealing to many. For sports fans football, both Professional and Collegiate, is winding down with just bowl games and the National Championship for the colleges and in February the Super Bowl which caps it all off. Basketball fans are getting warmed up and as winter breaks the baseball fans will emerge. However, over all this is the time to sit back and reflect on the beauty of the area, reckoning with Holiday bills and the time to work on having a positive attitude towards the new year and the optimism that in a few months the sun will be back out on a regular basis and our towns and villages will once again become the places people love to come and visit!!

Take a moment and relax and enjoy the quiet because for now the party is over but it will start up again before you know it!!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

On the night of November 16th/17th the Leonid Meteor Shower will peak in the wee hours of the morning. This shower is maddeningly unpredictable. In 1933, it was described as 'like a child's sparkler held against the sky.' In 1966 it burst forth over the central western states in the greatest meteor display in recorded history. In other years, it has failed to show up at all.

The Leonid's are the stuff of Comet Tempel-Tuttle, first seen in the United States from the rooftop of the Naval Observatory by Horace P. Tuttle, just as the Civil War ended. Given permission by the Superintendent to put his comet-seeking telescope on the Observatory roof, this curious little man was an inveterate comet hunter.

Read more about Novembers Meteors and other Sky Lore here....


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

For many of us the drive to and from Yachats and Florence is one of the most beautiful and scenic drives on the Oregon Coast.

From starting at sea level then going up and down over the hills as the ocean goes through its many changes. One day the weather is good; clear and sunny, but then the next day could be stormy with visibility marginal at best and sometimes of year very foggy!

It is always an exhilarating drive and one I look forward to every time I make it. Since I have friends in Florence and like some of the stores there I go from Yachats to Florence frequently, in fact I know the road pretty well. That said I must add that the one thing about the drive is that cell phone reception is rather spotty.

There are sections of the drive where there is no cell phone reception at all and others where the signal is on for a second then drops. So when I take the drive I usually don't bother turning on my phone until I reach Florence or Yachats depending on which way I'm going.

I have a friend that lives in Florence and the other day she was mentioning her poor cell reception and I suggested she contact her provider and see if they have automatic cell reception updates in their system. Mine does and every so often I upgrade my reception capability by using designated numbers on the keyboard. She did and so did I and I'm thankful that I did because the next day I had a lunch date in Florence and my way down from Yachats I came up a short straightaway just a bit North of The Oregon House when I saw a man standing in the highway waving me to stop.

I pulled off the highway and looked across to the East and there was a small convertible upside down in the ditch.

The man that waved me down and two other drivers that had also pulled over ran to the car which had apparently just rolled and were yelling to call someone but their phones didn't work.

Well mine did and I called 911 and as the driver was yelling he was okay and the others were checking for leaking gas I was talking to 911 and gave them the location.

I had to leave at that time as the others had the situation under control and about five miles down the highway the first of four first responders came roaring by with sirens blaring.

For once I was really thankful for a phone that worked when it was most needed. Plus I was amazed at how fast the Florence emergency folks worked!

So, another beautiful drive from Yachats to Florence and back was completed but with a touch more excitement than I'd bargained for.

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

This phrase is probably the common explanation of divorce. However it can also apply to any breakup weather it be a romantic split, a business that is changing, or even in education when a student changes schools or majors.

There is something in the particular scenario that apparently cannot or will not be resolved satisfactorily by all parties involved. I’m sure most of us have experienced irreconcilable differences at some point in our lives but when you live in a small community, village or town like the ones we do those irreconcilable differences have a more dramatic impact that irreconcilable differences in a large metro or urban area where the parties involved just fade into the large population and go about their lives and business without too much interruption.

Here in our coastal environment those breakups or splits can become a bit more complicated. In a village like Yachats, a breakup often leads to one of the parties re-locating to a new place.

In Yachats where everyone seemingly knows everyone it can be tough to jump into a new life or career when all the main players in the scenario are running into each other at the post office, store, restaurant, or other common places where folks congregate.

Over the course of time that I’ve lived in Yachats I’ve seen several instances of irreconcilable differences leading to houses going on the market for sale, businesses shutting down, memberships in service clubs dropped and friends and acquaintances saying farewell and moving away to start new lives. I always felt bad watching those scenes playing out although as often can be the case the new situations the people found themselves in apparently turned out better than the situations they left.

Well now it’s hit home for me. My longtime girlfriend and I have come face to face with a relationship that has some irreconcilable differences.

In this case Florence has gained a new resident while Yachats lost one. However despite the awkward time of breaking up its been handled as well as could be expected and I’m sure there will be light at the end of the dark tunnel for both of us. The bright side of the picture is that two coastal residents who enjoy the Central Coast are still here and plan on continuing to enjoy this special part of the world.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon of November was called in Colonial times the Frosty or Snow Moon. The Hopi Indians knew it as the Initiate Moon, the Algonquin called it the Beaver Moon, and the Lakota Sioux called it the Moon of the Falling Leaves.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

I’m going to a wedding in Yachats this week, actually to a wedding celebration since the wedding is taking place at the home of the Bride and Groom with family members in attendance but the reception/celebration is going to be a Village celebration. The reason; the Bride and Groom are long time Yachats residents and have many friends from the area who will be there to show their support and pleasure at seeing the too marry. After all, they have been together for many years.

I’m writing about this because in a Village like Yachats or other small towns an event like this is big. It’s the talk of the Village and reminds me of years ago when I lived in Condon, Oregon. It too was a small town and when something exciting was happening everybody knew about it. It wasn’t in the local paper or on the radio but trust me, everyone knew. I remember Saturday afternoon celebrations at the Grange Hall that rocked!

From young to old, everyone attended. It was a great excuse to get dressed up and see all your friends and neighbors for a fun event. That’s what this Wedding celebration is going to be. A outstanding reason to kick up your heals and say “Howdy” to those old friends you haven’t seen for awhile, meet new folks, and enjoy the beauty of living in a Village that likes to kick up it’s heals now and then.

Since both the Bride and Groom are well known Yachatians and have worked in a variety of occupations with, and for, a lot of other Yachatians, Waldportians and Florence residents it will be a wonderful gathering of some of the Central Oregon Coasts classy partiers. Both the Bride and Groom are musicians in addition to their other skills and when you assemble the number of musicians that are showing up to provide musical entertainment you will need a music director to coordinate who’s playing with who!

Plus her musical talent the Bride is a well known culinary woman who has worked many events in the area and the local food connoisseurs will be gathering to check out the BBQ that is happening. I guess you can say this will be a taste of the early West; a celebration at the local Lions Hall where music, food and good cheer will surely make this one of the most talked about celebrations to hit Yachats in a long time.

If you're going I'll see you there!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

As we roll into October I sense a feeling of optimism along the Central Oregon Coast. Football fans of the Ducks and Beavers are very optimistic about their chances and in early October that is very warranted. Politicians are coming out of the woodwork honing in on the upcoming elections and in their political rhetoric optimism rings. How could it not if you’re a politician running to win! You have to believe in and pitch optimism; “things will be getting better, mark my words”. Heard that mantra before somewhere?

In Yachats I really do sense an optimistic climate, C & K Market is open, the motels are doing well, there are several restaurants that have lines of patrons waiting to get in on several nights a week and judging from the traffic flow, Yachats and the surrounding area is getting a healthy influx of visitors stopping for a look and sticking around to enjoy the Village and the campgrounds. There are brand spanking new yellow traffic lines on several streets and at the moment there is a street paving exercise going on with streets sporting a new, smooth surfaces just in time to greet the coming fall rains.

Most notable though are two new establishments that in the spirit of positive optimism are open and ready for action. Restaurants; Yachats Underground, which has been open for a month or so, and the newest addition to the restaurant community; “Ona” which opens mid-October, are opening their doors and expecting good things. Both restaurants occupy spaces that were restaurants before but are geared more to the coastal economy as opposed to big city pricing. As we Coastal residents know in the fall and winter local traffic is what keeps local merchants alive and from what I’ve seen and heard management and ownership of these two new eateries is prepared to adhere to that school of thought. So as a Yachats resident who happens to like going to restaurants I applaud the optimism of the community of restaurants and businesses that are putting forth an optimistic idea and hopefully keeping that mind set. Now all we must do is to help them continue to count on us is to patronize them and the rest of the local merchants up and down the coast that are optimistic that we will!!

Good luck to all!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Cockle Shells

"A loaf of bread", the Walrus said, "is chiefly what we need; Pepper and vinegar besides are very good indeed-Now if you're ready, oysters dear, We can begin to feed. By Lewis Carroll in "Through the looking-glass."

A couple of weeks ago I attended the annual Oyster Cloyster at the aquarium in Newport. It was great! I especially loved watching the jellyfish swim around but most of all I loved the food. It's impressive how many creative ways oysters can be prepared. My favorite was the deep fried oyster ice cream made by Chef Charlie Bradford of Local Ocean Seafoods of Newport.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

The full Moon of October is called The Hunter's Moon. The ancient Greeks identified the Moon with Diana, goddess of the hunt. The Sioux called October's Moon The Dying Grass Moon. In China, it is the tradition to eat 'mooncakes' about the time of this full Moon (or September's, depending on their lunar calendar), to mark the fall of the Mongol Yuan dynasty in 1368. Rebel messages were concealed in these cakes, which were filled with nuts and candied sweets. They say it is this Moon which ties lovers together with invisible threads. Have a mooncake together.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Cartoon Depiction of a witch Throughout history, the last night of October was traditionally celebrated as the eve of Winter by the ancient Celts... and the beginning of their New Year.

In ancient Ireland a new and sacred fire was kindled on this night, from which all the fires of Ireland would be lit. The Celts believed this date a crack in time, when the dead could revisit the living.

Astronomically, we are midway between the Autumnal Equinox and the Winter Solstice, the year's quarter days. The Sun is now rising half-way down on the southeastern horizon towards the point at which it will rise in the dead of Winter.

It is a cross-quarter day, and one of peculiar significance. This was the ancient pagan Feast of the Dead, when all sorts of things went bump (and sometimes more) in the night.

Read More October Lore


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Once a year I write a column about the beginning of football season and that is now upon us in full force. From the Pee Wee leagues to the National Football league it’s time for action. Unfortunately for us Village of Yachats dwellers we have no team because we have no school or organized football team but like many folks around the state in similar population scenarios that doesn’t keep us from being football fans. Fortunately on the high school level we can root for both the Florence and Waldport teams and since they don’t play each other there doesn’t need to be divided locality! However, as we move on to the collegiate level the plot thickens a bit. In Oregon, and especially here on the central Oregon coast, there is the ongoing battle over being an Oregon Duck or an Oregon State Beaver.

On Saturdays it’s amazing to see the number of Duck and Beaver flags flying on cars and trucks on Highway 101! In fact I know many households that are divided, Ducks and Beavers under the same roof. It’s great to see and I love to eves drop on conversations between Duck fans talking about the lowly Beavers and Beaver fans blasting the Ducks. By the time the Civil war game between Oregon and Oregon State rolls around the rivalry will have reached fever pitch and perhaps this year the Civil War game will decide who goes to the Granddaddy of all post season bowl games; The Rose Bowl. Personally I root for both teams since I am a native Oregonian and grew up in a mixed household with my Dad going to Oregon and my Mom going to Oregon State.

Finally moving on to the professionals I’d venture to say that in this area there probably more Seattle Seahawk fans than other fans but by the same token there are die-hard fans around here that root for Chicago, Green Bay, New York, New Orleans and the rest of the teams. Those teams are always referred to as “my” team and for good reason. “My” team gives me something to get behind, to read about, to watch, to talk about, to brag about and to be heartbroken sometimes by. But like all football fans everywhere I’m going to stick with “my” team through thick and thin. That’s what keeps the sport of football so popular; a chance to root, cheer and go on and on about “my” team.

So to all you fans, I hope “your” teams do well and that we all enjoy another great time of year with a great sport; football…

To reach Rick Schultze: email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

We here on the Central Oregon Coast have a plethora of sights that we see on a daily basis. From the spectacular views, the wildlife, the sea life, the natural and man-made attractions, there are plenty of sights to keep even the worldliest person occupied and entertained. However, there is nothing quite as fascinating as watching young children who are visiting see what we see all the time.

Recently Crystal and I were visited by her two young Grandchildren ages five and nine. They are from Medford and have been to Yachats before but this time they stayed a full week and if anyone wonders what it's like to spend a week with kids exploring the coast I can tell you it's quite enlightening. In their week long stay they covered quite a bit of territory from Newport in the North to Florence in the South. When you think about it, there is a lot to do and see in that slice of Oregon and when you see it as a kid, according to them it's “awesome”!

Where are you going to find several lighthouses, one of which is haunted, a spectacular aquarium, a sea of sand to play in and two “cool” old towns with several stores that have what kids are quite fond of; sweet treats!

I admit that I've seen most of the sights the kids saw and over time have become accustomed to them so I just kind of notice them then go on about my business. But you should hear the excitement in the kids’ voices when describing the jelly fish at the aquarium, the whales they saw rolling at the mouth of the Yachats River, or the dune buggies they watched in the dunes. The level of excitement is contagious; I got excited just listening to the narration. But not all of their coastal pleasures came from shops, restaurants, lighthouses, aquariums or roadside attractions like Sea Lion Caves, no; they were thrilled to watch the ever present Seagulls hovering about as picnickers at Yachats State Park fed them. To a kid nothing is quite as exciting as having a gull dive down and snag a piece of bread right out of someone's hand. I'm sure when they left they would have loved to have a Seagull go along with them to become their flying memory of the Central Oregon Coast!

To reach Rick Schultze email; yarick@pioneer.net



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well one thing about living on the Central Oregon is that you get to see lots of animals. Deer, Elk, Bears, Coyotes and a plethora of others and of course birds. The largest population of birds appears to be Seagulls but there are also Eagles, Osprey's Hawks, and Herons and of course the Crow population who cause much anxiety amongst those who garden and try to grow crops. My connection with animals is that I enjoy all the species I run across and witness as they cavort in the sky but I don't like to develop up-close and personal relationships with them. However, that said, I will confess to having a one way relationship with a deer who tried to leap over my moving car and failed. That not only ended poorly for the deer but it didn’t exactly make me a favored customer with my insurance company. Then yesterday as I was leisurely going down Hwy 101 around noon a bit north of Yachats I glanced to my right and there beginning to lumber out of an outcropping of brush was a large Black Bear bent on crossing the highway. He wasn't going nearly as fast as the late dear so I swerved and blew my horn which sent him bounding backwards and off towards the ocean. Needless to say my heart was pounding with the thought of hitting something else of the animal species and having to deal with that then calling my insurance company and telling them I'd hit a bear, yes a bear, not a deer. I suspect I would have received some sort of notice that my insurance suddenly cost more or that I didn't have it anymore. Fortunately it was just a scary close call and both the bear and I lived to talk about it!

Then when I got home I was ion the kitchen when I heard a banging in the front of the house. When I went to investigate it turned out to be a Seagull perched on some deck furniture on the deck and pounding on the window with its beak. Well that may sound odd but last week we had visitors from Virginia and they enjoyed feeding the birds like most visitors do. So in the absence of a fairly steady supply of bread crumbs Mr. Seagull too it upon himself to remind me that he was there and just because my visitors had left it was no excuse to quit feeding him. I had to laugh because he was extremely persistent and had remembered where the treats had come from. Well I took him a chunk of bread, we had a brief discussion and he flew off no doubt cursing me and the rest of mankind until the next treat came along. So here on the coast, you might not expect it but there are animals and birds that can suddenly become part of your life.

Enjoy and watch out for the critters!!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon of July is traditionally called the Thunder or Hay Moon. Native American Indian tribes called it the Buck Moon (good hunting).


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch
Hello Darkness, my old friend... Well, maybe. In most places, there's so little real darkness folks have forgotten what it's like. Whole generations are growing up having never seen the Milky Way. Go ahead, take a survey of your friends, your kids, your mom, the man-on-the-street. Chances are they wouldn't know their home galaxy from a chocolate bar. Light pollution, as a result of urban growth, is destroying our view of the Universe. Even in Yachats.

Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch
Typically this time of year we have friends and family that come to visit and enjoy the Central Oregon Coast. Frequently they are return visitors who are familiar with Yachats, Waldport and Florence since whenever they come we generally do something in each of those places. The more regular returnees have their favorite local spots and pencil in a visit to each on their itineraries. As Yachats residents it's a treat to return to various spots with friends who have been looking forward to visiting them for sometime. It makes the visits even more enjoyable since the visitors feel more like locals than feeling like tourists visiting for the first time; in fact several regular visitors we see frequently know the staffs of some of their favorite spots and exchange greetings each time.

This year for the first time we had visitors from the fine state of Virginia. They have been on a nationwide trip with their 26 foot fifth wheel trailer and made it to Yachats for the first time this week. It was their last stop before heading back East via the northern route across the country so it has been quite the visit. There were three visitors, one who was a Southern Oregon resident for many years, but the other two had never been to Oregon let alone the Oregon Coast. You can imagine what they must have felt when the first laid eyes on the sparkling blue Pacific and the vivid greens of the forests. They parked their fifth wheel at Carl G. Washburne Memorial State Park 14 miles north of Florence and came up to Yachats to begin their visit. We did the usual tour of the area stretching up to Newport and down to Florence and many stops along the way. This went on for several days and I realized that I began to really appreciate this area more than before. I suspect it was having several sets of eyes from people totally unfamiliar with the area and my reacting to their amazement and excitement. I think those of us who live here and have for years might take some of this magnificent part of the world for granted a little bit. Well next time it seems that life here is just ho-hum and mundane, become a tour guide for some visitors and I'll bet you'll walk away with a renewed love of what we have!

Enjoy and make our visitors feel like they are at home…

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I hate to sound like a broken record but it is summer and here on the Central Oregon coast several factors come into play when it comes to paying attention. From where I live in Yachats I can see Highway 101, the mouth of the Yachats river as it flows into the ocean and in the summertime I see some amazing things. My favorites of course are the people who come to the coast on vacation or for a short visit. The village of Yachats is a friendly, lively and entertaining place to be and the mood of the residents and visitors is generally very good even though it can be hard to cross the highway due to the traffic! People watching this time of year is outstanding since we get a plethora of varying styles, shapes, and fashions. It is never boring to be sure.

However, summer also occasionally brings dangerous and scary events and extremely close calls with the influx of people. Traffic wise I witnessed one of the closest calls Ive ever seen the other day when a large pickup towing a large boat was driving through town and suddenly out of nowhere a Mercury Sedan shot right out onto the road in front of the truck and boat. The driver of the truck was observing the speed limit and was fortunate enough to have just enough room to slam on his breaks and avoid t-boning the Mercury. Then to my amazement the passenger in the Mercury starting swearing at the driver of the truck. I was floored, it was totally the Mercury's drivers fault yet the truck driver was getting hammered. It’s probably a good thing the truck driver didn't retaliate or there would have been some blood shed!

Then yesterday afternoon I was once again reminded that the ocean while beautiful, is also very scary. In the afternoon I heard sirens and looked across the river to see emergency vehicles including water rescue ski-doos gathering on the road behind the Yachats Inn. Then I heard the sound of the Coast Guard helicopter and realized that it was hovering over the ocean looking for someone. Some time later as the fog continued to roll in I heard a cheer from the assembled crowd and saw the helicopter set down on the road. It turned out that a 45 year old surfer had fallen off his surf board and got caught in an outgoing riptide. A couple of summers ago the same thing happened to two surfers and it was a helicopter that plucked them from the ocean. The moral of this is; that ocean is very powerful and unpredictable so use the utmost caution when in or around it!

Now today its back to being a delightful day in Yachats and it seems that everyone is paying attention to what is going on!!

Have a great and safe summer...

To reach Rick Schultze: email yarick@pioneer.net.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well I know we are alive and kicking in Waldport and Yachats and Florence. Just try to cross Hwy 101 without bumping into vehicles or pedestrians, it can be tricky, but on the flip side, people are visiting this area in droves! It’s a great and welcome sight to see the faces of folks happy to be here. During the doldrums of a wet and soggy winter we saw some visitors but once the sun came out, schools let out and the 4^th of July weekend happened things have changed and as they say “here we go again!”

As a long time Central Oregon Coastal resident I’d like to give you a quick reminder that the highways and byways here on the coast from North to South are a bit different than the freeway and city street systems many visitors are used to and it takes a bit more concentration since the views are so often spectacular that often people will forget they are on a busy road and slow down suddenly to take in the view. Well this is fine if there is plenty of room and nobody is following too closely. If not you might witness a fender bender or two.

It can be hard to drive behind someone who isn’t quite sure where they are going and continually slows down and speeds up trying to find a street or turnoff. I’d suggest that defensive driving skills be implemented this time of year especially since we here generally know where we are going as opposed to visitors who aren’t sure. But how can you really complain about the drivers who are visitors and are soaking in the amazing sights of the coast? It’s one thing if you are driving through Portland and dealing with freeway on and off ramps and the endless merging necessary to get from one side of town to the other. Here it’s nature that holds the wild card.

A huge cloud formation on the horizon or the sun magnificently setting can throw even the most cautious driver for a loop. Those things are just too awesome to witness, but lets all take a moment and remember we are sharing the roads with others so be careful and enjoy what this great area has to offer!!

Enjoy summer, it seems to have arrived!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon in June has traditionally been called the Rose or Flower Moon.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Extra! Extra! Dog Hit by 18-Lb Meteor!

Did you know that on June 25th, 1947 the term 'flying Saucer' was coined? Or that on June 19th, 1961, VanCraft Knitwear in Rhode Island began research on spacesuit components? Or that on June 30th, 1908 a giant fireball (or a small comet) laid waste to Tunguska, Russia? Or that on June 13th, 1983, Pioneer 10 became the first manmade object to leave the Solar System? Or how about this: on June 28th, 1911, in Nakhla Egypt, a dog was killed by a 18 pound meteor.

If these are the sorts of facts you like to look up at on the wall calendar as you munch your morning Wheaties, then you must get a letter out in the mail today, to:


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

The other morning on the radio I heard a police report about a man who had broken into a residence in the Bayshore area of Waldport. Apparently the man broke into the house and the owner of the house heard him and got outside with her cell phone and call authorities. They arrived and tired to coax him to surrender and come out but he wouldn’t so later in the night three different police agencies entered the house and took him into custody.

He was charged with Burglary 1, Criminal Mischief II and harassment charges. He was lodged in the Lincoln County Jail on $180.000 bail.

It sounded like quite an event when I first heard it then the next day when I found out the identity of the man and the home owner it really hit me. I know the man; in fact many years ago I used to work with him. What really struck me was I was aware that he had mental issues but I always thought he was quite harmless. However because he is rather big in stature and has a mountain man looking bear he can appear to be quite menacing.

When I worked with him some of my co-workers were afraid to ask him to do anything because he would just stare at them before shuffling off to do the task. They would often complain that he made them uneasy and eventually he left the job. However being here on the Central Oregon Coast in a relatively small town I think probably saved this man from real harm. What I'm talking about is the rash of deaths that have occurred in larger cities recently when police officers have been called to deal with mentally challenged individuals and given the situations there have been unfortunate consequences. This man I'm sure had no harmful intentions when he broke into the house, it is after all the home of his stepmother, but in a big city with S.W.A.T. teams primed for action he could have easily be taken out as a threat to all.

It would be understandable for the police to be wary, they of course have no idea what is going on, but in this case I think they acted very well and determined this man wasn't a raving nut but someone who needed to be taken into custody as much for his safety and for the safety of others including the home owner. What I hope the outcome of this will be some sort of help for this fellow. I have seen him for years wandering up and down the highway with a faraway look and the several times I've spoken to him he as a very vacant stare and little memory of who I am.

Not being a doctor I can't speak as an expert but I think a little compassion and some serious mental health work would be the best thing he could receive. I'm just glad he wasn't caught up in a big city scenario when it moves so fast and is so oriented to putting a quick end to the problem that he would have become an easy target. I think this was a blessing that he was here and the authorities acted with restraint and competence!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net

 



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Crystal and I headed to Newport the other morning to drop her car off for some work to be done on it and were returning to Yachats to have a leisurely breakfast at the Adobe when an amazing event occurred. We were in my car just south of Newport in South Beach across from the entrance to Oregon Coast Community College when out of the brush a deer suddenly bolted towards me and before I could do anything it bounced off of the right front fender, knocking out the headlight, skidded across the hood and smashed into my windshield.

.The force of the collision propelled the deer across the highway and left us stunned but unharmed thanks to the safety glass windshield which was bent severely inward. A phone call to 911 gave us the instructions to stay put which we did for a minute or two then I checked the traffic and crossed back over the highway to where the deer lay unconscious just out of the traffic flow. Suddenly the deer appeared to wake up but couldn’t move so two truck drivers who had stopped pulled it off the road onto the soft sand shoulder. About that time two Newport Police officers arrived with lights flashing and the action continued in front of the morning traffic which was slowing down to look before speeding up again and continuing on.

The first officer directed me to drive forward to the entrance of the College and pull off the road. He followed me and began to fill out an accident report and took pictures of the damage and statements from both of us. He also took my insurance information and checked my drivers’ license and registration. At this point he also informed us that the deer had been dispatched and was bound for the Wolf Sanctuary where it would become food for the Wolves. In accordance with Oregon Vehicle laws I was informed that since there was over $1500 in damage I had to go to DMV to fill out an accident report.

Crystal and I were basically reeling in shock and amazement at the situation and how fast it had happened and were filled with sadness for killing the young deer. However both Police officers were a tremendous help and one of them followed me to Power Collision Center where we began the process of calling my insurance company, arranging for a rental car, and filling out forms. Shortly Enterprise Car Rental had a car for us and within a few minutes we were off to DMV to fill out the accident report. Believe it on not all of this occurred in less than two hours and even though we never made it to the leisurely breakfast we did manage to have a solemn but good lunch and a chance to reflect on the fact we hadn’t been hurt which we easily could have been given the circumstances. Bottom line; never take anything for granted, life can change in a blink of an eye.

To reach Rick Schultze: email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I wrote a column recently about going from Yachats to Corvallis to get my back repaired. Well that has been done and I'll give you a quick run-down so you others with bad backs can have something to relate to. Also for your partners, spouses, family and friends who helped you along the journey.

I was slotted in early Tuesday morning so we went over Monday night and stayed at the Mario Pastega House. A wonderful facility on the campus of Good Samaritan Health Services. It's for folks who have family in the hospital or those like me that arrive the night before surgery. It has a full kitchen, laundry, comfortable clean rooms and is extremely reasonable rent wise and about two minutes away from the main hospital entrance.

Bright and early the next morning I hit the hospital and began a day of undressing, waiting, being wheeled around on a gurney, taking a two hour nap and waking up in a hospital room with lots of tubes hooked up. I didn't feel any pain when I first came back to consciousness but a bit later the pain of an operation was there. So like when I had my hip replaced the gracious nurses offered me a bit of relief via some pain pills and I settled into watching TV listening to the chatter of other patients and their visitors. Crystal was there when I first woke but she took advantage of being in Corvallis and went shopping! I would have loved to have gone too even thought I don't like shopping but I was highly immobile at the time.

Since this was my second operation in a couple of years I quickly got into the hospital routine and the continual nurses visits to take vital signs and other readings. I was scheduled to leave in the morning so I ordered dinner from the menu, visited with Crystal after she returned and prepared to zonk out so I could get the night over and my plan almost worked until shortly before ten o'clock when I got a roommate. The poor guy was in pain and it took the nurses and orderlies quite a while to get him into bed. The whole time all the lights were on and watching that scenario was like watching a TV hospital drama except I was in it!

So the night was long, I'd doze off only to be woken up frequently by the nurses and as soon as my roommate would see that I was awake he'd start talking to me. I will say he was in a lot of pain and the pain killers they were giving him made him quite talkative. But overall it was a good experience. I managed to get some sleep, the doctor came and cleared me to go home and Crystal and I checked out and took the drive home to Yachats which had never looked so good!!

I'm doing good now, very little pain and a bit of stiffness but trust me, nothing like the pain I had before going under the knife!

Hopefully if you have to experience a situation like this is will be a good one for you too, it certainly isn't anything to look forward to but in my case the operation helped!

To reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Into the Valley to get back a good back.

Nope, not a misplay on words, I have to trek from Yachats to Corvallis to get a good back. What that takes is surgery; a Laminectomy. That is the name of the surgery that removes the Lamina from the affected vertebra to take the pressure off of the sciatic nerve that was pinched from a damaged or worn out back disc.

But enough of the medical talk about backs, all of us have had some back pain and many of you have dealt with sciatica, you know the pain that shoots down you leg feeling like your leg is on fire! Not a fun feeling at all and I for one am ready to commit that feeling to becoming a distant memory.

The reason I’m going to on this journey into the valley is that the doctor who gave me a new hip a couple of years ago in Newport highly recommended the Neurosurgeon that is going to fix my back and he works for Samaritan Neurosurgery at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis.

That’s one thing about living in a village like Yachats; it’s tough to find qualified Neurosurgeons in the neighborhood.

On the other hand a trip like this will be an adventure. A few days ago I had to go to Corvallis to pre-register at the hospital and have some x-rays taken along with an EKG reading and a blood draw. After that I was issued a bright red “Direct Check In Card” which allows me to proceed to the “Short Stay” check in station the morning of my surgery. It’s quite a sensation to arrive at a hospital as large as Samaritan which has more people working there than live in Yachats. It’s literally another world, a self contained city. From the Valet parking to the cafeteria serving really good food, the plethora of nurses, doctors, orderlies and maintenance workers scurrying about, and the office staffs in each section busy on the phones make for a fast paced operation that is always buzzing. I really feel like a small town dweller when I get inside the hospital, there are more direction signs there that in airports. I’m sure there is a real danger in getting lost in there, who knows who would find you!!

So with high hopes Crystal and I will head into the valley and a couple of columns from now I’ll tell you how the adventure went. Hopefully when I’m doing that I’ll be loving my new and improved back!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

No one knows where the tradition of "April Fools" came from. It's origin has been wrapped in obscurity for a long time. Some claim that the custom has something to do with the Vernal Equinox and the coming of Spring, and that may be true, for legend has it that Demeter, hearing the echo of her daughter's screams as she was carried away to the underworld by Pluto, went searching for the echo, and did indeed go on a fool's errand. The Romans celebrated the feast of Cerealia (Ceres was the Roman name for Demeter) in early April.

 

Read more on April fools here....


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

To me those words mean it’s time to enjoy: enjoy baseball and softball. It’s that time of year when the ball fields get trimmed and ready for action and the players get to lace up the playing shoes, grab the bat and glove and begin their season. Baseball and softball are great sports that kids can start at a young age and play it at many levels for many years. There are youth leagues in this game that others might not have although all sports these days have youth leagues but baseball and softball were the first to implement them. Baseball and softball games are very family oriented and because of the normally nice weather during their seasons they are great reasons to gather up friends, neighbors and family and take in a game. Waldport and Florence both boast of their baseball and softball teams with good reason and the support in both communities shows that. I’m betting that most of you have attended more than one ball game and had a good time doing it. It’s hard to beat a game that features drama, enthusiasm and teamwork with various levels of skills. To see young people and young adults playing their hearts out is very good stuff!

For me both baseball and softball played big parts in my life. Born in Portland Oregon I began playing softball in church leagues at the age of nine. Then I moved into Little League baseball. Those teams and acquaintances I made playing paved the way for more playing and meeting other kids when we moved to Roseburg. To be able to play ball was a great icebreaker for “the new kid on the block” and it made the move easy for me. This was also the case when we moved on to Sacramento California. I still always look forward to baseball and softball season with fond memories of the hours spent practicing, playing in games, traveling to away games and the many fellow ballplayers I’ve met over the years. I hope you that are players have great seasons, you that are parents and team supporters enjoy the efforts of your kids and for you fans, it’s that time of year to Play Ball get out to the ballpark and enjoy your local baseball and softball teams in action.

To reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The first sure sign of spring besides the Daffodils popping up and the sunny, rainy, sunny, rainy weather scenario is how Yachats suddenly gets lively during Spring Break. Looking down at Highway 101 last evening I was amazed at how many people were walking around downtown Yachats. With all the gloom and doom about Yachats in the past few weeks it was a bit surprising but then again not surprising. Every Spring Break the village fills up. The motels, inns, and resorts seemed full and there were a lot of no vacancy signs lit up. Of course the restaurants were hopping and despite not having a market at the moment it appears that those who came to rent houses brought their supplies with them. As with Spring Breaks in the past there are many return visitors who are regulars. They tell me Yachats welcomes them with open arms and they feel right at home, a great feeling to have when you are visiting someplace. And of course Yachats is a great spot to set up camp then shoot off to the many sights near the village. This year the Whale Watching Here folks are out up and down the coast and there have been many spottings of the migrating whales which add to the ambiance of the area. On the beach for the first time this year there were several small bonfires which even though they are illegal, looked great at dusk and I could just taste the hot dogs being BBQ ed!

Seeing all these people who are having fun exploring, walking, flying kites, dipping in the ocean, shopping, hitting the Friends of the Yachats Library Book Sale, and the Yachats Art Guild Exhibition and enjoying the Yachats Lions “all you can eat breakfast” is a good positive shot in the arm for we Yachatians who would much rather be showing off our village and wonderful area to folks than reading or hearing about the economic downturn causing business to close. There are many businesses going great guns in Yachats and the C&K Market is to open in the next week or so adding to the positives of this village. Again we Yachatians invite you all to come visit and check out what’s happening in the Gem of the Oregon Coast!

Happy Spring!

To reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I was reminded the other day about the upcoming Annual Book Sale The Friends of Yachats Library are pleased to be holding in the multi-purpose room of the Yachats Commons Building, 441 Hwy 101, Yachats, on Friday and Saturday, March 26-27, from 10 a.m, to 4 p.m, both days. Donations of books will be accepted at the Yachats Library until March 25.

All you bargain hunters, dealers and book lovers take note; there will be hundreds of almost new, gently used, old treasurers, mysteries, cookbooks, gardening books, fiction, nonfiction, children’s books, biography, travel, history, and humor in hardcover and paperback. Browsing is easy with all books arranged by categories. On Friday hardbacks/softcovers will be $1 and paperbacks will be 50 cents.

There is a specially priced section including rare books, signed copies, book sets, coffee table books, including leather bound Louis L’Amour novels. The sale also includes audio tapes, DVDs, CDs and videos also priced at $1. Saturday is bag day. For $3 you can fill a plastic grocery bag. Proceeds from the sale are used to add to the library’s collection and equipment.

If you love to read you will want to be at this sale, it’s a book lover’s delight. Browse to your hearts desire and you are bound to find something that will tickle your reading pleasure. These kinds of book sales are fun and it’s a lot of fun to visit bookstores; those rooms full of the written word as well as books full of photos. There is something about books and for me it goes a bit further. I've written a book and it's in various libraries, book stores, online and in the Kindle format. Consequently I've been to book signings, book fairs, book readings and book club meetings and after each one of those events I feel re-charged about books. You hear often these days that books are dying and I suspect that is somewhat true but to go to a book sale, book store, book signing event or other gathering of readers it would seem that despite the news of books being down and out the book world is actually alive and well.

Perhaps it's because most folks at the sales or stores or literary events are really tuned into reading and treasuring books their enthusiasm is contagious. It's hard not to get excited when others around you discover a book they must have or an author reveals how the story they wrote came about or when the book store clerk recommends a book that turns out to be a great read. That excitement sticks with you. For writers and those who want to write these events are what keeps their writing world turning. To realize that something you wrote is being read or will be read is enough to keep you pounding the keyboard. It's a very quiet but powerful part of the book world, the hours spent thinking and practicing writing. My suggestion is to all of you book lovers out there, go to a few sales and few stores and listen to some authors and again your love of books will again speak to you and set you in some literary motion!

Enjoy and keep books alive!!

To reach Rick Schultze; email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
The Full Moon for March is traditionally called the Sap, Lenten, Crow or Worm Moon. But I would rather refer to it as the Awakening Moon, which is what the Plains Indians called it.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Sadly on Saturday March 6^th 2010 the woman known as Shirley passed on to another place. Shirley was a legend in Yachats and was known all over the Northwest and others parts of the world. You see she owned and operated “Shirley’s Cottage Industries” in the heart of Yachats from 1983 until now. Many, many, visitors, locals and wayfaring travelers on Highway 101 stopped and visited Shirley’s and if you’d ever visited there you’d know why nobody ever forgot their stop or stops.

Shirley moved to Yachats when she was ten years old and attended school in what is today the Yachats Commons. She continued school in Waldport and graduated from Waldport High School in 1953. At that point Shirley hit the road to explore the world and in her travels worked as a bartender all over the West including stints in Hollywood and Hawaii. Returning to Oregon she worked in many establishments including the brand new Salishan Resort when it first opened and for may years The Town House in Newport before returning to Yachats to start “Shirley’s Cottage Industries” in 1983 with her Mother in what was known as the “Clarks Market Plaza” on the west side of Highway 101 in the heart of Yachats. Eventually she relocated to the east side of Highway 101 where the shop stands today.

It would be an injustice to simply list the many accomplishments of this small, but strong woman which include being a Mother and Grandmother then just close the book on her life. No, Shirley embodied much more than just being a hardworking woman who worked diligently for her whole life, she was a character of the highest order. Life experiences gave her a wide scope of interests, stories and a treasure chest full of opinions which she shared freely with anyone who asked and some who didn’t! In her shop which was open seven days a week, she served as a notary, sold fishing and hunting licenses and bait, had one of the first copy machines in the area and a vast selection of gifts, books, trinkets, beach supplies, clothing and other items necessary for a great visit for visitors and helpful items for locals folks. She also decorated for all the holidays and seasons with giant colorful balloons making downtown Yachats quite the festive spot many times of the year.

She had her name changed legally from Shirley Ann Harley to just Shirley after a divorce and if anyone could live being known by just their first name it was Shirley. Nobody that ever came into contact with her would forget her. She loved to talk and for those of us who knew her well a visit to Shirley’s meant you were ready to spend some quality time catching up on the latest action in the village. She also did things that many weren’t aware of for example; she held the cash box for the Yachats Lions Thrift store. The operator of the store would go to Shirley’s to pick up the box and returned it to her at the end of the shift.

In a village like Yachats which is always changing and businesses come and go “Shirley’s Cottage Industries” was the oldest business in the village and surely the most unique. There was only one Shirley and to coin and old phrase when Shirley was created “they threw the mold away”. There will never be another Shirley and we were fortunate to know her.

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

In the summer getting up in the morning in Yachats usually means there will be action going on downtown. Visitors and village residents moving about preparing to hit the beach or the coffee shops, the gift shops, book store, library, and restaurants. Later in the day the action shifts gears a bit but there is still a lot going on especially at the Market where folks are stocking up on supplies.

In the winter it's sort of the same scenario but with fewer visitors except during the winter holidays when the village fills up with festive folks from all over the country and world. However, as I've written many times in recent weeks this year there hasn't been quite as much action downtown since the Market closed. As you can imagine the Market was the hub of the downtown area. As folks gathered to shop they also pursued the shops, talked with one another, bought newspapers, gossiped, used it as a spot to meet folks arriving in town and a variety of other things that main stores in a small town are known for.

With its demise the center of town was action less so to speak, quite a shock to those who have visited Yachats over the years, imagine the hub gone!

Well this morning as I wandered down the hill I noticed a fleet of trucks outside the Market and workers working feverishly inside the empty building. Then I knew the rumors were true, the Market was going to re-open and from the looks of things, soon.

By the time I hit the post office the word was spreading, no doubt the folks across the street from the Market having their daily visit to the Green Salmon Coffee shop were speculating on what was going on. Several folks I met were outright rejoicing at the thought of being able to buy milk or eggs in town instead of a trek to another store.

I know the senior population who aren't the most mobile of the residents are thrilled, they once again won't have to leave town to shop! Several I spoke with didn't care who was moving into the Market as long as it was a Market! I don't know if you've ever experienced the loss of the only grocery store in your town but it's more profound that you can imagine but today I'm, like many others, feeling giddy with excitement. Soon the action will be back in downtown Yachats!

Come and visit and enjoy the new Market!!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

As spring approaches it's noticeably lighter in the early morning which is nice for those that begin their day's early. However it's still very dark at night and for Yachats that is really true.

In a little village like Yachats the loss of several businesses and no lights emanating from the shut buildings makes it seem like a bit of a ghost town but that's not to say there is nothing happening in Yachats, far from that, but going through the Village at night without the familiar glow from the Yachats Village Market and recently from the Landmark Restaurant and Lounge just seems odd to the residents.

Of course the first Yachats causality was the Health Clinic, now an empty building with a big for rent sign adorning the front window. Then the market, and now the Landmark. Besides the loss of jobs to local workers and the variety of food stuffs, meals and entertainment offered to the locals and visitors the demise of these three has led to a massive rumor mill.

Who will take over the market if anyone? Who will take over the Landmark if anyone? This is the main topic of conversation these days in Yachats. While there are several outstanding restaurants and many fine businesses operating in Yachats it's the rumors that permeate the air.

The post office, a great gathering information spot in Yachats is usually abuzz with folks asking the same questions. There is skepticism, optimism, and other schools of thought but for sure if you want something to talk about in Yachats, just ask “what's the latest on the store or the lounge or clinic?” You'll get answers and a variety of good ones.

As of today I haven't found one real or substantiated answer to any of those questions and I've asked many folks. Of course when money is involved as it is with all three I've mentioned no one except the financial players really know what's going on. I suspect that at least two of the three will come back to life.

The health clinic is doubtful without a tremendous financial infusion but both the market and lounge have been run successfully in the past and I predict will be again be up and running shortly with lights brightly shinning once again. In the meantime if you want to get in on the action hit the post office or the Green Salmon Coffee shop and starting asking the million dollar question. “What about?”

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

That’s a question a lot of us are asking I’m sure. Did you make resolutions and are you keeping them? Did you vow to improve on certain aspects of life? To spend less, work harder? All the above are legitimate questions and we all have answers for them that fit our situations. However, the human side of our good intentions can sometimes overpower the ideals and frankly that’s a good thing. If we didn’t have the option to change our minds how dull and boring would we become? Imagine everyone shopping consciously, cutting back on entertainment, being so green we’d glow, and other great goals? What would we do for scintillating conversations on how to shop, spend, conserve, and other topics if we all agreed? I’m afraid boredom would set in and all the good intentions would gradually fall by the wayside.

So while I didn’t make a bunch of resolutions to change me and the rest of the world on New Years of 2010 I did do a couple of things that I set out to do. The first one was the second I got my tax information I did my taxes. The second one was to join a great fitness club in Florence where my girlfriend and I swim daily, enjoy the sauna and I get good exercise for my beat up body. It’s ironic since I live in Yachats and there are four motels with swimming pools but unless I rent a room I can’t swim here. All the motel owners would love to allow that but unfortunately their insurance doesn’t cover anyone except registered guests and as much as I’d like to I can’t rent a room every time I would like to take a swim. On the plus side of things a friend of mine in Seal Rock recently opened his BBQ restaurant in a fairly small building but just the other day moved to a larger spot close to his original spot. Now that’s a good move for a New Years move; it’s positive and points towards progress.

So I guess what I’m saying to all of us here on the beautiful Central Oregon Coast is to enjoy the New Year, think good thoughts and try to follow through on at least a resolution or two, the good ones of course!

Cheers and have fun!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
February's Full Moon is called the Snow, Wolf or Hunger Moon. The Full Moon also marks an astronomical event, the first of the year's four Cross-Quarter Days (Groundhog Day, Mayday, Lammas, and Halloween).  See page two for details...

Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Earth Reaches Midpoint in Orbit Between Solstice and Equinox:

February 2nd is an astronomical Cross-Quarter Day, one of four days in the year when the Earth is midway between the the Equinoxes and the Solstices.

This month's Cross-Quarter Day is called Groundhog Day in the USA, and I'll bet that 99.9% of the population has no idea of its astronomical origins. I'll bet that even in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania they don't know about them.

The age-old tradition of watching the passage of the Sun in the heavens to know when to plant early crops and begin sending the cows and sheep out to summer grazing lands was handed down from the early Celts (who called the day Imbolog), to the Roman legions, and thence to the Medieval Church (who called the day Candlemas).


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

You live in Paradise; do you go on vacation?

That may sound like an odd question but the answer is yes. It makes you appreciate paradise even more. Think about it, we here on the Central Oregon Coast from Seal Rock to Florence and points in between pretty much are living in Paradise.

I mean where else can you gaze at the beautiful Pacific Ocean, the vividly green hills, the wide expanses of pristine beaches, the rocky shorelines with waves cascading over them on a daily basis. Or watch the whales migrating, the sea birds soaring, eagles and hawks darting through the sky and the fantastic sunsets as the sun disappears over the horizon.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: feltch

Have you heard the word Super?

Well it’s getting to be that time of year when the word “Super” gets used a lot. We already use the word frequently in phrases like supersize, superstore, superstore, supersmart and even superdumb. However now it’s going to be Superbowl! Yes this is the forty fourth time Superbowl has been on the minds and in the speech of millions of people. Football fans and even those who are not necessarily football fans are aware that the Superbowl is going to be talking place. This year the game is being played in Miami at Land Shark Stadium and features the rock group The Who as halftime entertainment.

I’ve watched all but two Superbowls on television mission one because of being stuck on the ground in an airplane during a snowstorm in Montana and the other because I was in the air on the way to Hawaii before laptop computers and in-flight television. That was the 1969 Superbowl when Joe Namath led the New York Jets to victory over the Baltimore Colts. When we were informed of the Jets victory by the flight attendant the mostly young hippish crowd burst into applause and the more conservative passengers sat in silence. Broadway Joe Namath was the flashy young quarterback with long hair in the prime of hippytime!

 

Of course a lot has changed since then but in essence the Superbowl has remained the most watched sporting event in this country. Approximately one hundred and thirty million viewers will tune in this year, both those in this country and others all over the world. Roughly fifty five million dollars will be spent on food for the game and the viewers will be watching commercials that cost about two and a half million dollars per thirty second spot. These numbers are amazing when you think about it but it says something about the way people think.

Today we are dealing with some major political and economic issues and situations that are simply tragic and heartbreaking but for one Sunday, Superbowl Sunday, millions are going to put everything aside for a few hours to watch a game and enjoy the company of friends and family and root for their favorite team, enjoy commercials, and devourer food and other refreshments. It may only one day but for many including me, it’s a special day which provides memories for years to come. In fact I have forty three now and after this years Superbowl I’ll have forty four good ones!

May your team win and I hope all of you have a great Superbowl Sunday.

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: feltch

Even though this is a New Year at times it feels like things are happening so fast the year has already been long. First of course is the big change in Yachats which is now minus its grocery store and health clinic. Then there is the challenging economic picture that’s putting pressure on everyone. Elections and income taxes are upon us and on the goofy side of things the controversy over Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien and just who is going to take over the Tonight show. On one hand that is nothing to many people but to TV executives that is a sticky situation.

I guess you’d be safe to say that there are multiple priorities for everyone and the issues one feels are impacting them personally are the priorities driving their decision making. But the way the world is today is like watching the sand on the beautiful Oregon beaches shift and change. One day the beach is flat and smooth and the next day the same stretch of beach might be roughed up and bumpy especially if a heavy storm has hit the area. So rather than lament about tough times and uncharted futures it might be the right time to look at this as a time of opportunity to make some worthwhile changes to the way we live and act. Perhaps it will give us a chance to look at our situation and the situations of our neighbors and villages and towns and see if we can better them using our strengths and knowledge to take what we have and use it to our advantage.

We here on the Central Oregon Coast from Seal Rock to Florence are in the one part of the world where people gather to become “Storm Watchers”, Whale Watchers” and recently “Sea Lion Watchers” at Sea Lion Caves with their new sea lion visitors from San Francisco. When you look around the world you see devastation and human tragedy that makes our storms and wet winters here seem like child’s play. Here we are in paradise compared to most places. Sure, it gets wet and gloomy sometimes but that will move on just like the shifting sands. In fact, on the beach in Yachats near the mouth of the Yachats River there are rocks jutting out of the sand four or five feet tall. Two days ago those rocks weren’t visible but today they are. It is just like life, what was of sight is now here to see thanks to the shifting sands and our ever changing world as we see it.

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Just saying twenty ten seems to come very naturally as opposed to other New Years of the past and I haven’t even made the mistake of putting the wrong year on the checks I’ve paid my bills with. That alone gives me the impression that maybe 2010 might just be a good year. However some factors make the possibility that 2010 could be less than stellar but that’s where the “Rolling into 2010” comes from. If you’re a boxer you roll with the punches, if someone smacks you a good one you get back up and fire back. I’m guessing there are lots of us that have been smacked about quite a bit recently. Yachats where I live, no longer has a community health clinic or grocery store. For me that’s a problem but for the many seniors who live here and don’t drive it’s a real problem. As rumors swirl as to the future of the store folks are just kind of shaking their heads. In Waldport where they have already lost one grocery store it’s the same kind of wonderment; what happened?


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
It isn't easy, this star business, and it's terrifically hard to learn the night sky in any season, unless you have someone with you who knows it well already, and can tell the tales that make the forgetting impossible. Well, January's a good month to get started. Around 8 p.m. local time, there are constellations visible even in Yachats night skies that are easy to spot, packed up with the tales that should appeal to the kid in all of us. Start by facing South, and looking to the West...

Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

January's Full Moon is called the Long Night Moon, being the Full Moon nearest the Winter Solstice. It is also sometimes known as the Moon After Yule, or the Wolf Moon, probably after the Anglo-Saxon name for the month: Wulfmonath.

The latter is an allusion to the hunger of the wolves this time of year, which made them bold enough to leave the forests and enter villages in search for food.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch
A couple of days after Christmas my girlfriend Crystal and I attended a Holiday party at the Bayshore home of a family from Canada who also own a home there. The family are regular visitors to the area and have many friends in Waldport, Bayshore and Yachats so it was quite a gathering. One couple owns a home in Eugene and in Bayshore and are also regular visitors to the area. Since most of the people in attendance have lived many places over the course of their lives the regular Holiday Season talk and geography were high on the agenda along with the variety of opinions on a plethora of subjects and topical news stories of the day. The mood was quite festive and the food prepared by the hosts was an outstanding buffet of local goodies; crab, salmon and other tasty delights and a fine spread of local wines and Canadian beer. Some of the people knew each other and for some like Crystal and me it was the first time we’d met the others so it was very enlightening and entertaining. It’s interesting how many stories you can hear if you just listen to the conversations in parties like these. For a writer it is as good as it gets; a natural way to observe the way people interact and talk to one another. Also at this party many of the attendees were animal lovers and talk about dogs filled the air on more than one occasion.

Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Wow!!

Well under the bright lights of Las Vegas the Oregon State University football team fell to a talented bunch of football players from Brigham Young University in the MACCO Bowl. What started out as to look like an easy game for the Beavers turned into a windy, disaster. Of course it was just a football game and had no bearing on the way the world turned yesterday but the loss pointed out what has happened to so many of us. The giddy buildup to a big letdown.

These student athletes and coaches have worked all year, in fact for some many years, to get to a post season Bowl game. It’s no small feat and to achieve that is a good life experience that they will always have to cherish. But to get blasted like the Beavers did has to sting and I for one know how much the memories of a big loss seem to often outweigh the memories of triumph. That also can apply to the fans who truly believe that they drive the teams on and I believe that is a valid thought. All players like to hear the cheers of their supporters and their supporters love to see their player's coast to victory.

But let’s drop the sports angle and look at the letdown scenario as it plays out in real life. Perhaps it was the job interview that you had and left with a great feeling only to find out you didn’t get the job. For you guys, how about the time you asked out the girl you had your eye on and thought she was going to say yes only to hear “sorry”. Or girls, how about the time you thought the cool guy was going to ask you out only to hear him ask out another. All of these experiences are logged into your memory somewhere unless you are one of the lucky that just erases things like these and moves on. I’d say that might be the healthiest way to be.

Some things need to be remembered but I'd categorize those as necessary life skills and valuable knowledge like don’t use the hair dryer in the shower, shut off the car motor before working on it, don't leave your wallet on the front seat of your car with the door unlocked. You know, things that really matter. These other momentary tragedies probably won't amount to more than a lesion in life. They point out that there is no such thing as a perfect world where everything goes one hundred percent your way but they are certainly no reason to stop trying to shoot for the moon, trying for the perfect season, let your heart lead you on sometimes and above all remember that if you don’t try, you won’t get anything in return!!

To the Beavers, congratulations on a great season and I’m looking forward to next year!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Sometimes I wonder about folks who do risky things. There are lots of risky challenges from skydiving to deep sea diving and many other ventures that can turn risky in the blink of the eye. The most obvious risky challenges usually clearly state the rules of the game. If you’re skydiving you make sure you have a working parachute and an experienced pilot who can guide the aircraft to the right spot and oh yes, you check for the proper weather conditions to jump in. If you’re deep sea diving you need the best breathing equipment possible and a responsible crew to monitor your decent into the depths. If you’re a race car driver you want all the necessary safety equipment, good tires, a clear focus and a debris free race track.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Different views of the same season.

There will be tears in many eyes this holiday season. Both tears of joy and some tears of sadness. However, if we weren't human we wouldn't be having those kinds of emotions. For kids of all ages the holidays can be the times great and lasting memories are made. Perhaps the first gift that you will remember the rest of you life was waiting for you under the tree.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

What a sight!

I can’t count the number of times I’ve be stunned by the incredible sights I’ve seen traversing up and down the Central Oregon coast from Seal Rock to Florence. Every community you go through has its own certain unique charm and visual sights. The brilliant green forests that line the highway present sights fit for post cards and several outstanding spots are indeed on postcards seen all over the world. A glance at the sparking blue Pacific Ocean crashing against the shorelines or the seemingly endless expanse of water that stretches to the horizon as you look at it near Sea Lion Caves is always a memorable sight. On stormy days the clouds race across the sky in various shades of darkness. On some big storm days occasionally there will be flashes of lightning streaking in the sky and the claps of thunder that roars from the sea to shore and echoes through the hills. None of these sights will ever grow dull; beautiful and tranquil on nice days, scary and intense in rough weather. Nothing like the wind whipping the rain in sheets across the highway!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon this month is traditionally called the Christmas, Yule or Long Night Moon, being the full moon nearest the longest night of the year. The Lakota Sioux called it the Moon of the Popping Trees. The Cheyenne called it: Big Freezing Moon. Interestingly enough, there will be two full moons this year in December. The first full moon in December will be on the 2nd... (12/2/09) and the second full moon will occur on the 31st... the last day of year 2009.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

December 21st (2009) is the 41st anniversary of Apollo 8, the first manned flight to the Moon.

On that day astronauts Lovell, Anders and Borman left the Earth for a 6 day mission to the moon for a live close-up view, as well as the first complete look at the Earth from such distances.

Their photographs of a blue and white watery world against an inky blackness, and that of "Earthrise" over the lunar limb were wondrous, and sparked an increased enthusiasm for the manned space program. Seven months later Apollo 11 set off for the first manned landing on the moon.

Read More...


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

The Journey of the Rotisserie.

You know it’s great when you have friends who think about you when they’ve received a windfall or a gift and they turn around and present you with a gift. That’s what happened to Crystal and me recently. We have some friends in Waldport that got a new small Rotisserie cooker from the woman’s father. They already had one and know we like to cook and BBQ so they asked if we’d like their old Rotisserie. The Farberware Open Hearth Electric Boiler Rotisserie would be a perfect addition to our household especially as the weather turns to Oregon Coast wet and BBQing gets harder to do.

Our friends are big believers in giving something useful to someone who would appreciate and knew we would use it. After I went and picked up the little beauty I stopped at the market and grabbed a Cornish game head and headed back to Yachats to fire it up and try a style of Rotisserie cooking which I’d never done. After lining the drip pan with tinfoil for easy cleanup I placed the game hen in position and plugged in the Rotisserie motor which began turning the game hen. Next I plugged in the cord leading to the heating element and bam; smoke and sparks started flying. I quickly unplugged both cords and stood back.

After a couple of minutes I decided to try the heading element again and this time there were no sparks but the element didn’t heat up! So at this moment the project was a flop but we’d been in Salem earlier in the week and at the Value Village Thrift Center they had a similar Rotisserie without the Rotisserie motor. They were selling the heating element minus the cord for two dollars so the next day when we had to return to Salem for another appointment we picked up the heating element.

Once back in Yachats armed with another Cornish game hen I plugged in the new element and nothing. Turns out it wasn’t the element that was messed up it was the cord. Little sparks were jumping around in the head of the cord so that was quickly pulled. Now I began a trek to find a new cord. I searched online and they were available for a price plus shipping so I started off to the local hardware stores and they all had cords but they were all the wrong size. At our last stop I was about to give up when a woman overheard us talking about not being able to find the right size cord and asked to see the one I had.

I showed it to here and she said; “I have a cord like this. My husband and I have the same kind of unit you have but our Rotisserie motor is burned out. You can have the cord.” When I went to pick up the cord she also game another heating element. It was amazing, the kindness of a total stranger who basically said “you can make a complete deal out of this and I’m glad to be able to help.”

So today we have three heating elements, two Rotisserie bases and one cord. Thus I’m heading to the market for another game hen and tonight I’ll put it on the Rotisserie. It should work, the cord works, the heating element works and the motor does! All of this and all the goodness of friends should make this a special meal and if anyone out there needs a heating element; email me!!

To reach Rick Schultze: email yarick@pioneer.net.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Thanksgiving.

Forty nine years ago I was in San Antonio Texas on Thanksgiving Day. I had been in the Air Force for ten days and like all the other rookie airmen around me very lonesome and homesick. No matter how hard the chow hall cooks tried, they couldn’t provide us with the Thanksgiving dinner we were all missing. However, I must say that while the first nine days for we new recruits had been very tough and hard to comprehend Thanksgiving Day was much more oriented towards the spirit of Thanksgiving and even though the tough discipline of basic training still was paramount, the drill sergeants eased up a bit for one day only.

I’ll always remember that day as a mixture of both good and bad. The bad was that I was away from home my first Thanksgiving ever but the good was that even though none of the airman in my basic training flight knew each other we seemed to form a bond that day. All of us missed someone, someplace, and home but we discovered we had each other and over the course of our basic training became a solid and cohesive unit. It all started on that Thanksgiving Day in Texas.

I was born in Portland Oregon and had a lot of family there. For as long as I can remember we gathered on Thanksgiving at one relative’s house or ours and shared Thanksgiving Days with as many as twenty people, all related. We as kids sat at the “kids” tables and it wasn’t until we grew to large to sit at the tiny card tables did we manage to be integrated into the “adults” table. I remember the Thanksgiving Day when my cousin Katie and I reached the pinnacle of our youth and joined the adults while our younger siblings were banished to the “kid” table for yet another year. It was surely a rite of passage.

Those kinds of memories always come to mind when Thanksgiving rolls around and over the years I’ve had many more great Thanksgiving Day memories, having been invited to many fine folks homes, been to traditional and non-traditional Thanksgiving dinners, enjoyed different ways of observing Thanksgivings and watched some very interesting Thanksgiving Day National Football League games. I love holidays but Thanksgiving is always my favorite. Partly because of the food aspect but mostly because of what it means to give thanks for what we have and to share with those that don’t. Every year I also think about our military personnel who may be spending their first Thanksgiving away from home or their twentieth. I hope they can have a day of peace and get some feeling of being thankful for being able to be doing something as valuable as they our doing for our country. We most certainly thank these men and women and let’s keep “Thanks” in Thanksgiving here and pass it on to one another.

Happy Thanksgiving; I hope you enjoy it!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I heard the news today.

The phrase “I heard the news today” comes from the Beatles song “A day in the Life”. The phrase “I heard it though the grapevine” comes from a Marvin Gaye song and both phrases are pertinent to this week’s column.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Once Around The Barber Pole.

When I was a kid I used to read a columnist whose column was called “once around the barber pole”. The other day I found another columnist who has an on-line newsletter titled “once around the barber pole”. Both the columnist I read as a kid and the on-line newsletter appear to be referring to the days when the barber shop served as a kind of community gathering spot where guys would sit around and swap adventure stories; discuss politics, current events, sports, the weather and other timely subjects. Well those days are gone so this week I’m going write this column like those and try to give you your fill of current events and political stories without going to a barber shop! So here we go with little bits and pieces of what's going on around here.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Cruising around the Neighborhood!

Nope I'm not cruising the neighborhood looking for trouble but rather cruising the neighborhood looking for neat places and interesting things. When I was a kid in Portland my neighborhood in North East Portland was pretty much limited to how far I could get by riding my bike or catching the bus. Needless to say my area of cruising wasn't all that large but I had some favorite spots like the park near my house, the store down the street that had a big TV in the window and a speaker hooked up so you could stand on the sidewalk and watch and listen to the shows. Remember when I was a kid TV was still new!!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

In 2009, daylight time began on March 8 and ends on November 1

So it will only be a few weeks before we fall back once again.


Fall Back
Category: General
Posted by: feltch

Halloween is just around the corner, one of my favorite days! We here on the Central Oregon coast love to celebrate and even though our communities are small and many rather rural, Halloween seems to bring out the best in community efforts to give the Halloween celebrants the best Halloweens they can have.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

When is a Holiday a Holiday?

Every year after the Columbus Day I ask; was that a “Holiday”? It’s not that I doubt Columbus discovered America even though there are a multitude of opinions on that given that it’s been said that the Asiatic People who became Native Americans did or that the Norse expeditions lead to America by Bjarni Herjolfsson in 986 are well established historically. But that's beside the point, I'm talking about a “Holiday” which is supposed to be “a day free from work so that one may spend time at leisure, especially on a day on which custom or law dictates a halting of general business activity to commemorate or celebrate a particular event”.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

A Punch and Scandals Dominate the Media.

Well television and print media are having a field day with one television late night host and his alleged romantic affair with a former staffer.

Another current media favorite is a Mayor in Oregon who was facing a recall that didn’t happen. His discretions have been played out so many times on the news and in the papers that there appears to be a bit of disinterest in the whole deal. Needless to say the Mayor’s political life has taken a big hit and barring some grandiose deal for his city I’d say his political days are numbered.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Change, it’s inevitable.

Change is always present. It can come in the form of the weather changing, the political landscape changing, laws changing, moral interpretations changing, and a score of other changeable things. There is always something changing. We here on the Central Oregon coast have seen many changes and will continue to see more in the future as the population shifts, the economy vasilates, and the popularity of the coast grows.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Have you noticed the Green Wave?

No, it's not a wave full of green algae or the sludge from the ocean bottom as the churning of the sea dredges up seaweed and foam, but the movement to get people to turn Green. Green as in environmentally friendly. It's a powerful and sweeping wave that certainly isn't deadly like a Tsunami, and given all the study this wave appears to be a good Green Wave.

In Oregon there are over 100 Farmers Markets, 10 here on the coast, which throughout the summer months through mostly October provide people with places that offer locally grown, healthy produce.

This cuts the cost of transportation since its local, keeps the money mostly within the community. Portland alone has 17 Farmers Markets with a couple that operate year round. Then there is the Slow Food movement which was founded in 1986 in Italy to combat fast food.

The movement has since expanded globally to over a 100,000 members with chapters in 132 countries. There are 8 chapters in Oregon each with a leader who is responsible for promoting local artisans, local farmers, and local flavors through regional events. In 2008 Slow Food USA hosted its largest gathering to date when 50,000 people attended the inaugural Slow Food Nation in San Francisco. It was the largest celebration of American food in history.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The eggplant is a member to the nightshade family; its cousins are the tomato, green pepper and potatoes. Eggplants grew wild in India and reached Europe around the eighteenth century. Because eggplants are nightshades people believed the purple bulbous kind resembled the mandrake and must therefore be poison. They became known as mad apples and it was commonly believed to eat them would cause one to go insane.

The myths and legends surrounding eggplant are those of fear and superstition. Some scholars have identified eggplant as being the fruit described in the bible as the Dead Sea fruit. In this myth, fallen angels wandered by the Dead Sea in hunger and found purple fruits that looked delicious, but upon eating they discovered that the pulp had turned to ashes. The Jewish historian Josephus called the eggplant the “apple of Sodom”, and people believed the food unfit to eat. The fact that the eggplant grew along the Dead Sea was believed to be evidence of the existents of the mythical evil city of Sodom God destroyed.

In the Middle East Hindu’s also banned the eggplant, along with potatoes, onions, and garlic. They likened the plants to flesh foods. In fact, they believed that eggplants turned into meat: they had a reddish color, like blood; and a shape resembling a human head.

One Hindu sect has been known to ban eggplant not because the vegetable resembles the human head but the scrotum of a water buffalo. That’s not a very appetizing visual. Fortunately, this image changed and eggplant did eventually win its place not only at the table but in the medicine chest.

The eggplant contains phytochemicals which are non essential compounds proven to greatly enhance human health. These phytonutrients, which include phenolic compounds and flavonoids, act as antioxidants, neutralizing free radicals within the body and protecting cells from damage.

It is the pigment in foods that protect against cancers, heart dis-ease and age related muscular degeneration. The calyx part of the plant attached to the stem made into a tea is an old folk remedy for stomach cramps, calms smokers cough and mellows the effects of alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Powdered eggplant mixed with powdered cures pyorrhea and other painful disorders of the gums, rub this on the gums and leave it on until the pain subsides. This also stops tooth aches.

The eggplant has a significant amount of a wide variety of vitamins and minerals, although it is not an excellent source of any of them. Still, with less than thirty calories for every cup, and because of the respectable fiber content of eggplant, this nightshade vegetable is an ideal food for those who enjoy eating healthy, interesting, low-fat foods. The nutrition in eggplant includes potassium, manganese, copper, magnesium, and several b-complex vitamins. Magnesium has been proven to stop restless leg syndrome and helps cure insomnia.

Eggplant is bitter and can not be eaten raw; this weeks recipe is eggplant lasagna with home made noodles. Rick loved this.

Home Made Noodles

  • Egg Yolks And 1 Whole Egg, Whip This Until It Is Very Fluffy
  • Then Add 3 Tbsp. Cold Water And 1 Tsp. Salt
  • Mix In 2 Cups Of “Sifted” Flour, Any Kind
  • Roll Out To Desired Thickness On Floured Surface, Roll Up
  • Then Slice To About 2 Inches Wide And Hang To Dry

 

Eggplant Lasagna

  • Preheat the oven to 350*
  • Grease a 9 by 13 inch baking dish
  • 1 medium eggplant sliced and sautéed all vegetables until tender in ¼ cup of olive oil
  • 1 large diced onion 1 package frozen spinach thawed and rained
  • 1 6 oz. can tomato paste
  • 1 16 oz. can stewed tomatoes, not drained
  • ½ lb. mushrooms
  • ¼ head cabbage chopped
  • 2 carrots including green tops chopped
  • 4 large crushed garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp. each oregano, rosemary, thyme, and basil
  • 1 16 oz. container of cottage cheese
  • 1 lb. grated mozzarella cheese
  • 1 cup of parmesan cheese

Layer all ingredients starting with noodles then vegetables then cheese, bake for 40 minutes.

Enjoy!

Crystalhayes@peak.org


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Thoughts of Fall

As it begins to get darker earlier every day and there is crispness in the air I am looking forward to the approaching of Fall. The leaves are beginning to turn colors and the towns and villages here on the Central Oregon coast seem to look even cozier than in the midst of the summer flurry of guests and visitors who come and go. Now in the evenings the shops, stores, and restaurants beckon with inviting lights welcoming those who enter. Time moves a touch slower it feels like and soon we will be greeted with the beginning of the Fall and Winter holidays with all their colorful decorations and promotions.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
Blackberries

It is amazing to me that plants that are the most annoying and intrusive are the healthiest. One of the most tenacious is the blackberry, or commonly known as the bramble bush. Blackberries are an autumn fruit and if not harvested begin to decay in mid October. Mythmakers attributed this decay to the Devil who is said to have appeared on Old Michaelmas, or St. Michael's day, October 10th and cursed the plant. St. Michael was an archangel an archetype of Christ and it was on this day St. Michael defeated the forces of evil and banished the devil from heaven. According to legend, when the devil fell from heaven he landed in the bramble bush. This explains why the devil hates blackberries returning each year to spit or urinate on them causing them to die. The legend also warns that those who eat of this bush past this date will suffer disastrous consequences within a year's time.

In parts of Great Britain it is believed that witches cause the blackberry to whither.

Most traditions about blackberries are of ill omen, blackberries were considered fairy food and it was believed that anyone who ate them might well be doomed to remain in the fairy realm forever. Just touching this fruit would bring bad luck. These and similar legends were common to autumn as an explanation of the coming winter darkness and the long cold and baron land.

A recent study from the University of Oslo printed in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition identified blackberries as containing the most antioxidants per serving of any of 1500 foods tested. In a study published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, scientists from USDA's Agricultural Research Service and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health found that a compound in fresh blackberries arrested the development of skin tumors, reduced the growth of lung cancer cells and inhibited their spread to other organs. More research is occurring at universities around the world to identify the mechanisms at work that give blackberries their nutraceutical edge.

It's not surprising that blackberries are receiving recognition as the most healthful of all berries. Like the other members of the berry patch, blackberries are natural health foods long known for their medicinal values. Legend also tells us that if we pick these magical berries by the light of the full moon we will be protected from evil spells.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

My favorite recipe for blackberries is cobbler.

Fresh blackberry cobbler


* 1/2 cup butter
* 2 cups self-rising flour
* 2 cups white sugar
* 2 cups milk
* 3 1/2 cups blackberries

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Once oven temperature is reached melt butter in a 9x13 inch baking pan.

2. In a medium bowl stir together the flour, sugar and milk; batter will be slightly lumpy. Pour mixture on top of melted butter in baking pan. Do not mix butter and mixture together.

3. Drop blackberries into batter; if more crust is desired add less blackberries. Bake in preheated oven for one hour or until golden brown.

Enjoy!

Crystalhayes@peak.org


Blackberry Lore
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Is it only summer love?

As Labor Day closes the door of summer there are many who have made acquaintances over the summer that they would like to think of as more than “Just a summer love”.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

It's been said a many times that "pictures are worth a thousand words" and I have no reason to doubt that. I remember as a child looking at the old black and white pictures my parents had and listening to the descriptions of what the pictures were. Later looking at photos in history and sports books I tried to imagine what was going on when they were taken. Recently I've been looking at pictures of days gone by that were taken in Waldport, Yachats, Florence and the surrounding areas and the pictures are fascinating. To imagine what these places were like back in the early 1900's is an exercise in using your imagination to its fullest extent. You can almost put yourself into one of the old vehicles they used back then, or the boats they used, but it's kind of tough to imagine wearing some of the clothes but that was then and they were definitely dressed for the times.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon this month is called the Harvest Moon. The Hopi Indians called it the Feasting Moon.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Selling the Night Sky...

Selling the SkyAn Observatory astronomer here once had a great idea for making a fast buck. He'd nab a copy of the city's list of fire hydrants and sell them one at a time to anyone who'd send him a check for $50. He'd promise to name a plug after anyone whose check didn't bounce, and then send that person a lovely certificate and a map with the location of the hydrant on it. Then, he'd file his 'Fireplug Registry' with the Library of Congress just to make it really good and official.

Needless to say, much to his wife's regret, this fellow is still an astronomer and hasn't yet moved to the south of France. John Houseman is famous for saying that to make something really big, you must earn it the old-fashioned way, with hard work. In his case, he was talking about money. But it works that way in astronomy, too. Long nights at the business end of a telescope aren't a myth. Immortality isn't easy. So, it is particularly distressing lately to see the unsuspecting public taken by these 'star' dealers who, after exacting a fairly hefty price, promise to name a star after you.

These dealers promise to 'record' your star in an 'official star registry', that henceforth that star will be known by 'your name', and that a 'starchart' will show up in the mail which will point to the exact location of your star. The 'star chart' part of the deal is true. We know, because dozens of you show up at the Observatory with your charts asking for a peek at 'your star'. The truth is, no one is ever going to call SAO11392 by the name Rufus Q. Fishynoggin, or any other name for that matter.

There are billions of stars out there. The brightest of these were known to the ancients, and the names they gave to them are the popular names we still use today. The fainter stars are being given catalog numbers which are recognized by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), an internationally sanctioned consortium of the world's astronomers. The 'official registry' spoken of by the dealers (and by the way, there are several, so 'your star' may have as many names as there are dealers) is presumably kept nowhere but in their own offices. It is neither recognized by the IAU nor the Library of Congress (which has issued its own release on thissubject), nor any other Observatory, including us.

A friend of mine once told me he wouldn't know a constellation from a prune danish. Someone else said that he thought the Big Dipper was a pothole somewhere on Route 66. It seems many of you are functionally illiterate when it comes to the night sky. But it's certainly nothing to be ashamed of (they don't teach it in most schools, and most newspapers only carry astrology columns - definitely not the same thing). But there are ways in which anyone can become familiar with the night sky.

Sky Publishing Corp. in Massachusetts, the same folks who publish Sky and Telescope Magazine, produce a marvelous little gizmo (those clever Yankees) which will give you a current picture of the night sky once you dial in the date and time. We call it a Star Wheel. And it's easy to read, not something you have to stand on your head with in order to understand the projection. It isn't fancy - made of cardboard, it neither lights up nor whistles Twinkle, Twinkle, but it is something particularly handy. I've had mine for years, and find it indispensable in writing this newsletter. It'll even give you a fairly good approximation of when a particular constellation is due to rise - so should you, for instance, find yourself pining for Orion, you'll find that he rises just after midnight this time of year. They are good for latitudes between 30 degrees to 40 degrees.*

* Other latitudes are also available. Call us.

Gail S. Cleere - U.S. Naval Observatory.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Holy Rod or Nutting Day Hazelnuts or Filberts

HazleNutsOver the ages people around the world have developed numerous superstitions about hazelnuts, or filberts. Many of these beliefs stem from the fact that the hazel tree blooms twice a year, which accounts for the belief that the hazel tree symbolizes fertility. In Germanic lore, for instants, hazelnuts are considered symbols of immortality.

September 14 is the beginning of the nutting season. In the hedgerows and the woods the hazelnuts begin to ripen and break open; one must be careful not to pick the nuts while still green as the magical power of the tree streams into the nut at this time. To pick a green nut would offend the spirit of the tree. The nuts of the hazel tree symbolize wisdom and the branches make powerful wands and divining rods. A rod made from a Y- shaped branch was believed to possess supernatural powers of divination. The art of divining was called rhabdomancy this term is derived from the Greek rhapdos-rod and manteia-divination, and could find buried treasure.

Dowsing is the term used when searching for water, minerals and ore. Prospectors in some parts of the world still practice dowsing today. Sorcerers and wizards carried hazel rods, and in Greek myth Circe used her rod to turn men into swine. In Swedish myth the nuts themselves made people invisible.

In Greek mythology the two sons of Jupiter, Apollo, the God of harmony and Mercury the God of eloquence exchanged gift with which they would be empowered to provide a better life for humanity. Apollo received a lyre made of tortoise shell, whose tone would free the artistic spirit of mankind. Mercury got a winged wand made of hazel; its touch would enable men to express their thoughts by words. Ancient Romans revered the hazel tree and associated it with marriage burning torches of hazel during the wedding night to ensure a happy and peaceful union of the newly wed couple.

An old Victorian name for Halloween is Nutcrack night. On this night, old charms tell us to place a pair of nuts named after you and your lover, into a fire. If they burn to ashes together, you will have a long and happy relationship together. If the nuts crackle or jump apart, arguments and bickering can be expected. If one of the nuts catches flame and burns brightly, you can expect riches.

The ancients were correct in associating hazelnut with the heart. The hazelnut is magic; this nut protects, strengthens and gives the gift of a longer, healthier and happier life indeed, for they contain the second highest levels of Proanthocyanidin (PAC) of all superfoods. PAC?s are antioxidants that are twenty times more powerful than vitamin C, and fifty times more powerful than vitamin E. These antioxidants strengthen blood vessels, suppress platelet stickiness, reduce cardiovascular disease, lower blood pressure and delay the onset of dementia. They also contain folic acid, copper, magnesium, oleic acid, B6, iron and phosphorous. They contain monounsaturated fat and anti-diabetic fiber. Hazelnuts keep your heart beating and loving longer, and I hope you love this recipe as much as my Rick does.

Hazelnut Stuffed Roasted Tomatoes

  • Preheat oven to 350*
  • 6 medium tomatoes
  • 1/2tsp. salt
  • 2/3 c. hazelnuts, toasted, skinned and chopped
  • 2/3 c. parmesan cheese
  • 3 TBSP. fresh chopped basil
  • 2 tsp. minced garlic
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil

Cut tops off tomatoes and sprinkle salt inside each one then set open side down on a paper towel to drain. Mix remaining ingredients in a bowl. Place tomatoes in baking dish and fill with mixture. Drizzle with olive oil and bake for 30 minutes or until brown on top.

Enjoy!

Crystalhayes@peak.org


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Well it's that time of year again when some people are called upon to put their best social skills to work. A social skill is defined as 'any skill facilitating interaction and communication with others. Social rules and relations are created, communicated, and changed in verbal and nonverbal ways. The process of learning such skills is called socialization. Social skills can be measured on about how you treat other people and how do you react to them. It's a matter of dealing with the people around you.'


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

According to Wikipedia Dreams are a 'series of images, ideas, emotions and sensations occurring involuntarily in the mind during certain stages of sleep.

The content and purpose of dreams are not fully understood though they have been a topic of speculation and interest through recorded history'....
Now that's the 'official' definition of dreams but how many times have you heard the word dreams used in regular, everyday, sentences? 'The Street of Dreams', The Job of My Dreams', The Woman/Man of my Dreams', 'Dream Lover', 'I've Dreamed About This' to name a few.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

What an exhilarating feeling it is to be in first place looking at the rest of the competitors and realizing you're on top. That's what makes this time of year the best for the plethora of football players and their teams and fans that root for them. At this moment the teams are all undefeated, a perfect record. However, for everyone but the professional players none of these teams have played a game. Still excitement and optimism runs high with the players and fans. "It looks like a great team on paper" is a phrase that's heard over and over and while sometimes it's true that the paper model does well in reality, that's often not the case and sometimes that team that 'looks good on paper' gets blasted back to earth with their first resounding defeat.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The official definition of the Dog Days of Summer refers to the hottest, most sultry days of summer. In the northern hemisphere they usually fall between early July and early September. Think August. Dog Days can also define a time period that is very hot or stagnant, or marked by a dull lack of progress.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon for August is called the Grain or Green Corn Moon... When seen through August sultry haze, it is called the Red Moon.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

When you were a kid, ever have one of those warm summer nights when there was nothing to do, and you didn't have any money to do anything even if there was something to do, and your folks wouldn't let you do it even if there was, and you did? So, maybe you used to hang out with your buddies under the lamp at the end of the street, or maybe you used to climb up onto the hood of the family Ford alongside the house, lean back against the windshield and look up at the stars and wonder, as Huck Finn once said, "...whether they was made, or only just happened." And maybe, too, did you get real lucky some times, and spot a few shooting stars? Read More about August Skies


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Sounds of Summer.

Not at all like Simon and Garfunkel's song Sounds of Silence, the sounds of summer on the Central Oregon Coast are loud and clear. From the occasional siren on the highway, to the gulls squawking, to the crashing of the waves, summer is a noisy time of year. Of course it’s noisy in the windy and rainy seasons but it’s a different kind of sound than in summer. Summer noise is a much more exciting and spontaneous kind of lively sound! The sounds usually start early in the mornings with the various birds making their presence known. Then vehicle traffic begins to roll up and the highway and summer time life begins in earnest.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Voice Of Modern Television News Reporting.

Walter Cronkite who passed away on July 17'th at the age of 92 was perhaps the most recognizable face and voice of modern television news.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Mid-Summer Classic.

Wow, it’s mid-summer already? Apparently so as I’m about to watch the Major Leagues 80th All Star Baseball Game from St. Louis, traditionally played in mid-summer in the middle of the baseball season.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

That of course is the mantra when it comes to starting up a new business venture. However, we here from Seal Rock heading south to Florence are in the right location, location, location for a lot of action. Action of the good and fun kind!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well it happened again; an individual who meant a lot to a lot of people suddenly was taken by death. I know there several people of notoriety and fame who passed away near the same time, but Michael Jackson’s exit was the show stopper. Well it happened again; an individual who meant a lot to a lot of people suddenly was taken by death. I know there several people of notoriety and fame who passed away near the same time, but Michael Jackson’s exit was the show stopper.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Sometimes Being Low Is Good

Sometimes that isn't the best scenario except on the golf course score card or in some games of cards, but being low in this case could be a catalyst for something good to happen. This past week featured a tremendously low tide; a tide so low that we on the Central Oregon Coast were featured in all the newspapers around the state, all the radio and TV news shows, and even on several national news shows. They were full of images of the beaches with rocks spectacularly protruding, people digging for clams, looking for shells and agates, and sights of other things not normally seen during regular tide patterns.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Protests are viewed differently these days

If you've ever seen, been in, or studied mass protests by for a variety of causes from Civil Rights, political Ideologies, Religious Beliefs, Human Rights and Anti-War rallies and others, then you've seen similarities in the way the protests are conducted.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I had an appointment in Portland so my girlfriend and left our house in Yachats for the big city. It's always a trip to go to Portland with its big population because the biggest towns I usually frequent are Waldport and Florence and while both of them have traffic signals, something Yachats doesn't, they aren't exactly big cities.

We left early in the morning east bound on Highway 34 and since it was a weekday there was very little traffic. In fact we were the only ones for miles rolling through the quiet picturesque countryside with only the occasional clusters of cattle stirring. However that pleasant part of the journey came to an abrupt halt as we met up with Highway 20 in Philomath and joined the morning traffic heading into Corvallis. It was a reminder that there are a lot of people in the valley moving about and hitting I-5 north to Portland was like taking off at a busy airport, you've got to have your entry speed up or get run over.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well it's that time of year for graduations. For younger students at their first graduation to the older ones graduating from trade schools, career prep schools, culinary schools, high schools, colleges and the military academy's, there is excitement in the air. It's that time to look back at what you've done and look forward to the future at the same time.

No matter if it's a student's first graduation or that last one will they will have scholastically, it's a big deal. Not only for the students, but also for their families and friends. We here on the Central Oregon Coast probably all know someone who is excited about graduating!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
The Full Moon in June has traditionally been called the Rose or Flower Moon.

Yachats Sky Watchers
Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Waldport and Yachats have seen some interesting changes over the years. Many years ago the Yachats Ladies Club building was a lively dance hall on the weekends. Folks from far and wide would come to the coast to party and dance the nights away! In Waldport what is now the Moose Lodge used to be the school gym with kids doing what kids do in school gyms. Now of course the Moose is one of the best Moose Lodges in the West and the Yachats Ladies club is home to many community events but no dances there lately.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

By now you've been reminded over and over that the economy is less than robust and it's affecting all aspects of life including what to do for fun with out going broke!

As we approach the time for outdoor activities and vacations I noticed that in the area of the Central Oregon Coast there are lots of events and activities that hark back to the days when there were many events and activities that were relatively inexpensive but a lot of fun for folks.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Extra! Extra!

Dog Hit by 18 Pound Meteor!

Did you know that on June 25th, 1947 the term 'flying Saucer' was coined? Or that on June 19th, 1961, VanCraft Knitwear in Rhode Island began research on spacesuit components? Or that on June 30th, 1908 a giant fireball (or a small comet) laid waste to Tunguska, Russia? Or that on June 13th, 1983, Pioneer 10 became the first manmade object to leave the Solar System? Or how about this: on June 28th, 1911, in Nakhla Egypt, a dog was killed by a 18 pound meteor...


Summer Solstice
Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch
Helping Young Creative Minds.

Today more and more we hear the sad news of budget cuts in extracurricular activities in schools. Music and literary programs are often on the chopping block despite the long standing theory that participation in group activities is a tremendous help in developing young people into people that can inner act with others both socially and in the workplace. Teamwork is often an overused word but developing it, and understanding it, is important and when young people are denied the chance to participate in group settings that offer creative outlets it’s a shame.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well thinking about Spring today seems kind of funny as the rain and wind blast sideways. Seems like winter decided to stick around for a bit longer!

The only Spring I’ve seen recently was a picture of a Spring day in a gardening magazine. However, I’m not complaining compared to some of the Spring weather in other parts of the country; nope we’re just Oregon wet, wild and windy and soon it will become beautiful as all the flowers bloom, the greenery will flourish and the coast will be picturesque.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon of May is called the Milk or Planting Moon...

The name Milk Moon is from the Anglo-Saxon word for  the month: Thrimilce. Cows can be  milked 3 times a day in May. Since the Roman festival of the unhappy dead and that of the goddess of chastity was celebrated in May, this month has long been  considered an unlucky time for marriage. This probably explains the popularity of June weddings.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Mayday:

The first of May is Mayday, the second of the four cross-quarter Days of the year. It falls midway between the Vernal Equinox and the Summer Solstice, two of the year's quarter days. In Celtic England, Mayday was called Beltane. The Sun today will rise midway between the place it rises along the horizon on the day of the Spring Equinox, and its northernmost rising point on June 21st, the Solstice.

In old England (very old England), Beltane was a full-blooded pagan ritual day, where the gods were invoked for their protection during the growing season. Great bon-fires were lit on every hill (presumably a relic from the days of human sacrifice). Indeed, the very name Beltane seems to mean 'bright fire'. These and other traditions and rituals hung on for many centuries, for the most part, to the delight of royalty and commoner alike. General carousing and licentiousness seems to have been the order of the day.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

When you live on the coast the phrase “going to the valley” means a trip is on the calendar. Normally we coastal residents take the journey into the valley for a variety of reasons. Some are for medical appointments, some for business reasons, some for shopping, some for visiting and some just for the sake of going to the valley. Of course the valley is the Willamette valley and we’re going to Eugene, Corvallis, Salem, Albany, Woodburn, Wilsonville, Portland or many other inland communities.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Living with Bears

Yesterday I attended a seminar called "Living With Bears" and since I live in Yachats that stuck a familiar cord. The same also goes for those who live in Seal Rock, Waldport, Florence and the surrounding areas; we have bears amongst us!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
On a positive note!

Since I write for a couple of newspapers and web sites I have different deadline days but today as I write it’s Tax Day and listening to the news this morning I was reminded that there are “Tea Parties” taking place in various locations across the country. This of course is the modern version of “The Boston Tea Party” a taxation protest of years ago. That and other items of note filled the news cast so by time I was finished listening I’d had an earful of Pirate larceny on the high seas, the woes of the economic bail out strategy, and some references to corporate corruption. I was just about to shut the news off when I heard a positive, bright and exciting story.

It was about the Portland Trail Blazers basketball team making the National Basketball Leagues playoffs for the first time since 2003!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Is this the time?

Okay, have you ever wanted to start your own business? I’m sure many of us have going back to the days when we had a lemonade stands or canvassed the neighborhood for lawn mowing and cleanup jobs. There is nothing like being your own boss and being in charge of what you do, not under the thumb of some disinterested superior.


Rick Schultze
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon in the month of April is called the Sprouting Grass Moon.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Changing Tunes

At lunch today I had a conversation with a woman about how dull this country would be without all the things that keep people jabbering. For example what would the Republicans do without the Democrats to complain about and visa versa? What about the timber industry talking about the conservationists? The pro-life versus pro-choice debate is always a good conversation starter and if you really want to see people at their best attend a professional sporting event and watch the opposing fans heckle and taunt one another. Or listen to the plethora of ideas people have about what should be done with the CEO’s that took the money and ran. There are some sharp opinions about that one. But you know, all of it does create dialogue and that is a healthy sign. If you can talk to each other then there is a chance a happy medium can be achieved.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Logistics involved with changing jobs.

Logistics is one of my favorite words since I’ve changed jobs several times like many of us have. Roughly the word means “the management of the flow of things including people between the point of origin and the final destination”.

Originally a military term, it is often used today describing people moving due to a change in jobs and there can be good and bad logistics when it comes to that.

One scenario is when, unfortunately for many, your job disappears or is downsized and you have to move to find a new one, or have to change your life style to accommodate the new situation. Your logistics might be a bit raggedy since the level of stress in that scenario is going to be fairly high.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Spring Break is here!

Did you know Spring Break is also known as March Break, Study Week, or Reading Week in some parts of Canada and a week long recess from studying in early spring in schools in the United States, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, China, Germany and other counties?

I have my doubts about it being Study Week or Reading Week here in the United States but it could be true in other countries. I’m afraid here Spring Break means sun, fun, partying, and generally living it up. I know when I was going to school and Spring Break rolled around it was party time!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Social Networking

A few years ago people met new acquaintances at schools, workplaces, church gatherings, neighborhood events and from friends and relatives who would introduce them. In smaller communities like the ones we live in on the Central Oregon coast your opportunity for social networking was somewhat limited by population; you could only meet so many people unless you went to the bigger cities. There has always been the scenario of kids graduating from high school then leaving for college and never returning thanks to exposure to a big new world outside of their small towns.

However, if you have a computer and accesses to the internet there is no longer social isolation in small communities. Email was the first online way to reach friends and acquaintances, old and new, from anywhere with a few clicks on your keyboard. But email move over; Social Networking is a more popular online activity than email, according to a new survey. The survey by market research firm Nielsen Online found that on an average one of every 11 minutes spent online around the world is devoted to social networking.

Facebook ranked first with a unique global audience of 108.3 million people, followed by MySpace with 81.0 million. Classmates Online was in the second tier with a substantially smaller audience of 19.7 million. That’s a lot of people and I’m sure you know at least one person who is using one of those formats to communicate. An interesting aspect to Nielsen’s findings was “growth in social networking is being driven not by the young but by the middle-aged. The category of men and women aged 65 and above moving to social networking grew by 7 percent, while the 12-17-year-old category dropped by 9 percent. The most popular age group with Facebook in terms of growth is the 35-49 category, which increased by 24.1 million people.

So it now seems that social networking will be an enduring part of everyday life as valid ways to stay in touch with former classmates, ways to connect with friends and meet new people. Although social networking is possible in person, especially in schools or in the workplace it is most popular online. The internet is filled with millions of individuals who are looking to meet other internet users to develop friendships.

Of course with the volume of social networking sites growing daily there are concerns that there are people using the sites for questionable reasons. There have been complaints about MySpace users luring underage kids into bad situations and on some of the other sites there have been allegations of illegal opportunities being offered by both males and females. And as you’ve no doubt heard, what you see on the internet is not necessarily what you get. The picture often doesn’t match the real person.

But in the end social networking and the use of the internet is here to stay and I know lots of people who do network and have nothing but good things to say about it. I find it interesting and positive that people remain curious about other people and will take the time to communicate with them even though they may be miles and even countries apart and it is definitely a great way to stay in touch with family and friends.

It’s there for all of us to use but use it at your own risk!!!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net

 


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Listening to the news last night I was amazed to hear that Portland, Oregon was named the unhappiest city in America. That was according to Business Week Magazine who based their choice on a variety of factors, including depression rates, suicide rates, divorce rates, crime, unemployment, population loss, job loss, weather and green space. St Louis, Mo was number two, New Orleans number three and rounding out the top ten, in order; Detroit, Cleveland, Jacksonville, Fla, Las Vegas, Nashville-Davidson, Tenn., Cincinnati and Atlanta.

Well I was born in Portland and hardly think of it as an unhappy city, in fact I found it to be a very happy city to grow up in and when I visit frequently I really enjoy it! I can also say that I’ve been to seven of the ten cities mentioned and all seven of those places are, in my opinion, a lot more depressing and unhappy than Portland could ever be!

However I now happily reside in Yachats and that got me to thinking about our villages and cities here on the Central Oregon Coast. Are there unhappy residents here? Given the factors that Business Week used I know there are folks here who are dealing with many of those factors including divorces, unemployment and job loss but generally I don’t get an overwhelming sense of unhappiness. Perhaps that is why we live here, when things get goofy and out of whack we still have natures beauty, small town involvements, friends and neighbors who can be counted on and other factors that make living here much more palatable that it would be in a large urban city setting. It’s hard for me to become depressed when I zip down to Florence and enjoy old town, tough to be sad when I go visit friends or attend high school events in Waldport, don’t get at all sad when I stop in Seal Rock for a quick coffee or remotely bummed out when I go to South Beach or when I enjoy a meal in one of Newport’s many restaurants. The drive to Tidewater is always a pleasure, as well as the fun drive to Five Rivers.

I’m not suggesting that life is always rosy in our part of the world but in comparison to other parts of the country it’s pretty good. Again it’s hard to be unhappy when you see the sun gloriously coloring the sky in a magnificent shade of orange as it sets in the west or you catch a glimpse of a whale or watch an Eagle soar above the trees. It’s even hard to be unhappy when you get behind a school bus on Highway 101 that stops frequently to let the kids off. Just the sight of them bouncing off the bus and running towards their homes full of energy and enthusiasm can bring a smile to the face of even the grumpiest of us!

I’m not even unhappy as I notice the two deer right outside of my window taking aim at my rose bush but I’m going to wrap this up so I can politely ask them to go chew on something else!

Enjoy your life here and let’s count our blessings we aren’t in one of those real unhappy cities!

To reach Rick Schultze email; yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

March's Full Moon is traditionally called the Sap, Lenten, Crow or Worm Moon. But the Plains Indians of North America called it the Awakening Moon, which is the way I prefer to refer to it .


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

What do you get in Springtime (or thereabouts; that's how it is defined), when the Earth falls around it's orbit to a place where... if we mortal Eathlings were to gaze up, the Sun would line up against the intersection of two imaginary rings, and the stars behind that intersection are the stars of Pisces?

What if it just happened to be 3:44 a.m. PST on March 20, 2009? - What would we have then?


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Talking about history.

On February 21st longtime Yachats resident Virginia Gilmore proprietor of The Rock Park Cottages passed away. I’d known Virginia for many years and shared many a pleasant hour discussing a plethora of topics. As a former newspaper writer herself she would often call me with story tips and a few times I interviewed folks who stayed at the Cottages; Photographers, artists, and other interesting people. Virginia was a walking history book, full of stories and her passing reminded me that it is valuable to maintain contact with those people in our lives that are part of our history. Virginia had friends from all over and could point out where they’d fit in her life. I’m sure there are many people that have Virginia Gilmore stories and recollections and how she fit into their lives. I know those stores would be fascinating to hear.

It just so happened that the day I heard the news of her passing I had just finished talking on the phone to an old friend of mine from my college days who became a colleague when I was in the music business in California.

He currently is an entertainment broker in Nevada and specializes in tribute bands; bands that perform music made famous by others. Some of the bands play rock and roll from the Southern Rock Bands like Lynard Skinner, Marshall Tucker, and The Allman Brothers to name a few. Other bands pay tribute to The Doors, Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles and of course Elvis.

This tribute concept has been going strong for over thirty years and is an indication of how the music of each of these bands fits into someone’s historical memory. People go to the shows and remember what they were doing, where they were, and how they were living when the music they were hearing was live back then in their lives.

My friend and I had been discussing the different trends in music today as opposed to yesteryear when we stumbled upon event that we’d been involved with back in the late sixties. It was a concert in Sacramento featuring The Jefferson Airplane, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, The Strawberry Alarm Clock, The New Breed and Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band. We did the psychedelic light show that lit up the stage in the open air stadium. The memory of that stuck both of us as very funny and for the next few minutes we told each other our recollections of the show. The Strawberry Alarm Clock got their embroidered jackets stolen, The Nitty Gritty Dirt band playing an old time gut bucket bass and washboard, The Jefferson Airplane mesmerizing the crowd and the totally insane Captain Beefheart who rattled and babbled and played what many questioned was even music!

Historically the concert was the biggest to have been held in Sacramento at that time and still is in the annuals of the history of rock in Sacramento and the poster of the show is on display at the rock and roll museum in Sacramento.

An hour after the conversation with my friend ended and I’d been informed of Virginia’s passing it made me pause and savor the conversation I’d just had. We’d touched upon our history together and how that had fit into our lives. I was sad about Virginia, but glad I’d touched some historical bases with my friend.

I’d suggest we all do that now and then, you never know when you won’t have the chance again.

A memorial for Virginia Gilmore will be held on Saturday March 14th from 11: am to 12: pm at the Presbyterian Church in Yachats and a gathering with take place from 12: pm to 2: pm at the church where people can share stories and remembrances of Virginia.

To reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Onion Soup

Tears Of Joy

So, isn't it amazing that the things we love the most always make us cry? Everything, from old movies and lovers, to onions; and, I'll bet you didn"t know that the city Chicago means onion. The Great Lake Indians originally called onions She-Khe-Ony, so, I guess Chicago is the "Big Onion".

I love onion everything; onion rings, French onion soup, baked onions; they're fabulous cooked, boiled, grilled or raw.

In myth it is said that the Allium family which is garlic and onions sprouted from the devils footsteps as he fled the Garden of Eden (garlic from his left footprint, onions from his left). The onion was likened by some to a pearl; gold on the outside and white on the inside the ancients believed it symbolized oneness and unity.

Furthermore, the onion was spherical in shape, consisting of a series of orbs, one inside the other. To the ancient Egyptians and the Druids this structure suggested that the onion represented the universe. Because of this the bulbs were considered to be sacred. They swore oaths with their right hand on the onion, which to them symbolized eternity; a never ending succession of worlds upon worlds.

Plutarch wrote that Egyptian priests avoided onions because they believed that the onion plant budded as the moon waned and withered as the moon waxed. Therefore they associated the onion with evil. In myth the moon waned as the evil god Seth devoured the eye of Horus. Seth, the embodiment of chaos, threatened to destroy the forces of goodness and light and annihilate the world. People of other lands connected the onion with death gods and demons that lured people into states of un-consciousness or death.

Other ancient people believed quite the opposite; these believed onions and garlic protected them from evil. They rubbed garlic and onion juice in their eyes and ears or inserted garlic into their nasal passages. They also wore onions and garlic around there necks as protection from evil. It was also believed that the onion could revive the dead. In legend, onions stimulated strength, bravery and passion.

The fact is onions to protect us from many evil diseases.

They contain carotenoids, all B complex vitamins, vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, potassium. They improve kidney function, lower elevated blood sugar and are antibacterial. Half a cup of raw onions per day will prevent blood from clotting protecting us from hardening of the arteries, high blood pressure. Onions are great for breaking up mucus in the throat, lungs, and nasal passages.

They stimulate the adrenal gland and their concentrated sulphur and germanium compounds can be useful in treating cancer patients. Germanium acts as an oxygen transporter which also helps lung disease. Research has proven that onions, raw or cooked lowers cholesterol and acts as a natural antibiotic.

I could not cook without them; they are a base in most everything I cook. Today"s recipe is easy and so good. I made French bread from scratch for this and then the soup.

French Onion Soup

Thickly slice 4 large onions, break up with hands into rings.

Sprinkle onions with ½ tsp. salt and ½ tsp raw sugar.

Cover and set aside for 10 minutes.

Melt ¼ cup olive oil and ¼ stick butter on medium high heat

Add onions and a pinch of thyme and 1 bay leaf

Stir well coating onions in oil, lower heat to medium, stir often for about 35 minutes until golden brown.

Add 1 tablespoon Sherry to deglaze the pan. Add 4 cups of water, 2 beef bouillon cubes and 2 chicken bouillon cubes. Simmer 10 minutes.

Toast one slice of French bread per bowl place on bowl of soup, top bread with one slice of Swiss cheese, broil until melted remove from oven and sprinkle with fresh grated Parmesan cheese.

Enjoy!

Crystal Hayes can be reached at CrystalHayes@peak.org


Onion Soup
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

A Thorn On The Rose.

As columnist I often get my topics to write about from listening to people when I go to the various places I go. It could be at the market, the post office, the coffee shop or restaurant, at church, or any number of other spots where people in small towns congregate. So when I’m at any of these places my ears are open and because my column is in the paper weekly I often get calls and emails alerting me to things.

Well, recently my phone has been ringing and my email humming with an issue that is becoming the topic of Yachats, Waldport, Seal Rock and the surrounding areas including Florence. It’s all about the Yachats Community Health Clinic and the disagreement between the business manager and staff members.

If you’ve read the papers you’re aware that there is something going on and it’s not something that is making the community stand up and cheer about.

No, it’s a battle between factions that has turned a beautiful concept; first class health care for this rural area, into a cauldron of evil arguments.

As a columnist I try to be entertaining and enlightening and often get teased by segments of the reading population about why I don’t cover them instead of covering someone else but it’s mostly in jest and provides great dialogue of the positive upbeat nature. However the dialogue scorching ears about this Health Clinic is downright mean and tasteless. I can say for a fact that I know how hard the workers and volunteers and board members of the clinic work. It is sorely needed and in this day of economic shrinkage it becomes even more necessary. But people are being hurt, humiliated, misquoted, slandered, stabbed in the back and generally retreating into mini battle groups against one another. I know that early in March there will be a Town Hall Meeting at the Yachats Commons so that the facts can be put forth. I’m sure this will be a meeting well worth attending and I’m also sure there will be some vocal fireworks. I know people on both sides of the issue and frankly I don’t get the negative view. My concept of Health Care is to help, not hinder, to nurture, not destroy, to show compassion, not hate.

I’ll close with this; for all of you that have been served by the Clinic and those that will be served by the Clinic, this is the most important time in the Clinic’s existence. Please keep an open mind until you’ve been to the Town Hall Meeting, don’t aim more evil thinking and speaking at people who are trying to serve us all.

To contact Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
Local is in!

As things get tighter economically we here on the Central Oregon Coast, specifically in Newport, Waldport, Yachats and Florence are fortunate to be places where we can actually stay local. We can shop, get medical services, enjoy entertainment, have our vehicles serviced, go to the library, church and take advantage of a myriad of other services offered locally.

There are so many places in this country where one has to travel many miles to even see a doctor, let alone go grocery shopping.

The other night viewing the storm damage in the South West I was struck with the fact that many of the people impacted were miles from the nearest town or city. Of course they choose to live out in the country but that still doesn’t lessen the impact of having to spend many hours and dollars going into town for things.

There are a lot of folks around here also that live miles out of town but generally they are within easy commuting distance. They just plan their trips to town carefully and don’t make unnecessary ones.

On one hand it’s too bad the economy has such a adverse effect on where we go and what we due currently but could it be a blessing in disguise? Perhaps we can now get to know our local merchants and neighbors better by the mere fact of interacting with them more? Can we become more involved with local service organizations, schools, churches and schools? After all it can all be done locally and can be economically feasible. It comes down to a couple of things, donated time and effort by citizens and support from people within the community. Since it looks like it’s going to be a while before the dollars start flowing freely again it is definitely time to look around and begin to realize that what we have locally is well worth preserving and supporting. Plus do you realize how many great neighbors and friends you have right in your town?

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Memories.

Every year there are certain things or events that trigger memories.

The holidays, birthdays, concerts, elections, sporting events, graduations, vacations and other memorable occasions. For me this year has already stirred some great memories and it’s hardly started! I can’t wait to see how it ends up.

Since I’m a native Oregonian born in Portland I remember coming over to the coast at many times of the year since both of my parents were Oregonians and loved coming to the beach. We took pride in being amongst the first of what they now call “Storm Watchers” and if my Dad had a hint that there was going to be some wild weather blasting the coast we’d jump in the trusty Buick and head west. Those were fun visits but cabin fever would usually set in rather quickly since there were three young boys who got bored staying inside even though it was raining and blowing like crazy outside.

However, on the flip side if my Dad got wind of a stretch of good coastal weather like we’ve experienced recently we’d hit the road and those tips are fond memories of walking the deserted beaches in February enjoying the warm sunshine and watching the blue Pacific sparkle and shine!

This last weekend during the Super Bowl I experienced another event that really sparked a memory. The airing of a commercial NBC right before halftime in 3D! I had gone to the store in Yachats prior to the game and was given two pair of 3D glasses and excitedly took them home and prepared them so my girlfriend and I could see the commercial. Now as I mentioned I was a kid in Portland and in the fifties what was called the golden era of 3D occurred and my brother and I were right in the middle of it. I was eleven and he was nine. Since we were city kids and rode the city busses from Northeast Portland to downtown Portland to go swimming at the Y.M.C.A. we knew our way around and during summer vacation the Paramount Theater on Broadway had afternoon matinees featuring 3D westerns like Hondo and other epic pictures. Well we’d saved up our pennies made shoveling snow and cleaning sidewalks during the winter and with our parents permission religiously attended as many as we could, sometimes sitting through two showings! I can still remember dodging arrows flying at us from the Indians chasing the cowboys and seeing the smoke from the pistols and divots of dirt kicked up by the bullets coming our direction and ducking! What a sensation for us, we didn’t even have a TV at home.

So when I fit my 3D glasses on during the Super Bowl the memories came back in glorious 3D!

I hope you all have some good memories, they are fun to recall!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
February's Full Moon is called the Snow, Wolf or Hunger Moon. The Full Moon also marks an astronomical event, the first of the year's four Cross-Quarter Days (Groundhog Day, Mayday, Lammas, and Halloween). See page two for details...

Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Earth Reaches Midpoint in Orbit Between Solstice and Equinox:

February 2nd is an astronomical Cross-Quarter Day, one of four days in the year when the Earth is midway between the the Equinoxes and the Solstices. This month's Cross-Quarter Day is called Groundhog Day in the USA, and I'll bet that 99.9% of the population has no idea of its astronomical origins. I'll bet that even in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania they don't know about them.

The age-old tradition of watching the passage of the Sun in the heavens to know when to plant early crops and begin sending the cows and sheep out to summer grazing lands was handed down from the early Celts (who called the day Imbolog), to the Roman legions, and thence to the Medieval Church (who called the day Candlemas). These early peoples also watched hibernating animals to see what they would do on or about this day.

If they came out from their sleep and stayed up, it was time to begin the early planting. But if they went back into their dens, then winter was to last a while longer. When the first German immigrants came from Europe to Pennsylvania, they brought with them these beliefs and traditions. It was the honorable American groundhog who subsequently was endowed with the ability to predict the coming of Spring.

So, when you're watching your favorite news program and the story airs about a little town called Punxsutawney, and you watch the antics of grown men who should know better, and a little animal who doesn't, no matter what the groundhog ends up doing, smile wisely to yourself like the ancients did and remember that it's only 47 more days till the Vernal Equinox.


Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Yachats has a population of approximately 836 people give or take the season. A bit less in the winter, a few more in the summer but nevertheless it’s a small town or village as most people refer to it. Naturally in the summer Yachats is a popular getaway destination for many and the special summer events like the Smelt Fry and the 4th of July celebration and dazzling fireworks show draws visitors from all over and quite a few from other countries.

However, in the winter after the New Year and Christmas Holidays the village can grow quite quiet. For some that is great as they relish the lack of traffic and people, while others use this relatively quiet time to have some fun and invite folks to come enjoy Yachats and the surrounding areas. Two of these fun events come to mind both produced by the Yachats Lions Club.

The first one held last weekend was the annual Crab Feed. A real party with those in attendance feasting on all the Crab they could eat along coleslaw, French bread, baked beans and other refreshments. Almost 400 tickets were sold and both the Yachats Commons and the Lions Hall we full of happy eaters. In both venues the volume level was high with conversation and the sounds of Crab being cracked! It was a lot of fun for everyone with the kids especially getting a kick out of cracking Crab legs with the little wooden mallets the Lions provided.

The other time to have some fun in Yachats is coming up on February 7th. It’s the Fifteenth Annual Yachats Lions Barbershop Festival. This will be a night of spectacular singing and some great comedic moments. This too will be held in the Yachats Commons and will feature The Eugene Cascade Chorus, Sweet Adelines, Star Time and the Coastal Aires Chorus. These are large groups with many members and when you get all the performers, their families, and the crowd that comes to see the show the Yachats Commons will be packed and music will be reverberating with a joyous sound of many voices in harmony. Afterwards a good portion of the crowd and many of the performers will walk over to the Lions Hall for the “Afterglow” party which features spontaneous signing by the performers in a variety of combinations and there will be plenty of food and refreshments.

In addition to being a lot of fun and neat adventures, both of these events are fundraisers which benefit the community.

This is just an example of the kind of fun you can find in Yachats and other small towns along the Central Oregon Coast. It’s always there if folks seek it out. Some places are more fortunate than others in that they have the facilities to hold events and people to run them but this is Oregon and there are a lot of small towns and people just want to have fun. So I’d suggest

find some and enjoy yourselves and invite your friends and neighbors to come along!

~ yarick@pioneer.net ~


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I was one of the millions who watched the inauguration and during the ceremonies I let my mind wander to thoughts of how did we get to this day? Here in Yachats at 7:30 a.m. there were almost two hundred people gathered at the Yachats commons to watch the event on a big scremarten TV and close to two million on hand in Washington DC braving the cold to see it live. As the news stories broke they showed people all over the world watching and listening in tiny villages and huge metropolitan areas. I have yet to see the American TV ratings but have been informed they rival that of the most watched shows of all times including the Superbowl. No matter where one went there seemed to be a TV or radio tuned into it. Bottom line; it was a monumentious and tremendously historical event.

As the day unfolded I thought of my upbringing back in the fifties and listening to some people in their early twenties on NPR radios call in talk show realized that they had a whole different take than mine on the historical aspect of the election of Barack Obama. One caller from Eugene particularly caught my attention. He explained that until Obama surfaced he’d been pretty much politically uninspired. Disenchanted by the past Administration he now felt hope and excitement. But unlike me he had never experienced segregation openly like I had in the late fifties and early sixties in the South while I was in the military. I’m white and my fellow airmen of color couldn’t got to the movies or eat with me except on the base. Having grown up in Portland and gone to integrated schools, played sports, and socialized with African Americans, Asians and Latinos I was shocked and deeply saddened.

The young caller who I had listened too also had grown up in Portland and had gone to the University Of Oregon in Eugene and had known of the segregation issue but hadn’t felt or seen the sting. But this African American leading this political groundswell lead by had struck a nerve. Here is a man whose Father just sixty years ago wouldn’t have been allowed into some restaurants just because of his skin color but today that man has risen to become President. That the caller said really made him understand what had taken place and he vowed to open his eyes and heed to the call of service and above all, seek for understanding amongst people of all races, religions, and ideologies.

To me that was exciting to hear and I felt as good about hearing that as I did to finally see a man becoming President who gives a whole lot of credence to Dr. Martin Luther King's“ I have a dream speech.”

So here we go, lets all do our humble best to keep things heading upwards towards a productive, prosperous, harmonious and peaceful country and world.

 

yarick@pioneer.net

 


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Optimism

Here we are in January and there is no lack of conversational topics. Conversations range from excited to sad, doubtful to hopeful, serious to comedic, and the list goes on. Of course one of the main conversations will be about our new president Barack Obama; the forty fourth President of the United States of America. To many this is an extreme high, they foresee change and betterment. For others, they predict hard times no matter who the President is. Given the state of the economy it’s hard not to agree that we’re in for a struggle, however, for a few hours there will be a sense of optimism and celebration with the installation of Obama becoming a memory we will all carry with us forever.

Another conversation that is gathering momentum is the question on all football fans minds; who are going to be the teams in this years forty third Super Bowl in Tampa on February 2nd? Fans of the four teams that are competing to become the final two are optimistic their team will survive and enjoy thrill of victory not the agony of defeat which was so aptly put on the ABC Television’s old Wild World of Sports show which aired every Saturday.

The two teams that will play in the Super Bowl stand at the pinnacle of professional footballs biggest event and optimism runs high amongst their fans. For the fans and the players in that game that will become a memory they will have forever.

In a sense these type things could seem insignificant in light of the current status of the world and the struggles people are facing, but without something that brings excitement and optimism like a new President and the spectacle of the Super Bowl, life would be quite grim. Look around, this is January and there are new officials being sworn in to office in cities and towns across the country, the Governor just gave his state of the state speech and it is time for optimism and new beginnings. In Yachats for example there is a new Mayor, Ron Brean, and two new city councilors Annette Howarth and David Rieseck. These are unpaid and voluntary positions that require a lot of time and dedication. Waldport as well just swore in their City Officials.

Now without optimism for the future none of these people would be taking oaths. We all could benefit from watching and learning from these people, things might be tough and it can be devastating at times, but it’s also time to be optimistic and hope for the best. It does no good to just sit and complain!

It’s a new year! Enjoy, be optimistic and think positive!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Waldport SlideWell I’m an optimist and according to the press, radio and TV reports this wild, wet and destructive weather is going to take a break for a few days. Hopefully it won’t give Mother Nature a chance to catch her breath so she can start blasting away full force again, but you never know, as they say; “You can’t fool with Mother Nature!”

I’ve lived in Yachats for many years and remember vividly a few years ago when two houses slid down the hillside in Waldport when the hill collapsed due to the rain and loose soil. Now just on the other side of that same hill is a home teetering on the edge of a gaping slide which slammed into a home below, buried a car and closed the road. Fortunately no one was injured but it’s a mess and has had crews working feverishly cleaning it up. It was so weird to see the slide on the same hill that had let loose earlier; I can only imagine what the other home owners that are on top of the hill must be thinking.

After surveying the scene in Waldport I crossed the bridge and headed out into the Bayshore area. Turning left at the Bayshore Beach Club I headed south towards the end of the area and stared in amazement at the sand which had literally covered several houses and gave the appearance of being in a wet and soggy Sahara Desert. The little backhoes had cleaned up the road somewhat and the sand was stacked high on the roadside like snow drifts up in the mountains. In the meantime the wind was howling and sand was plastering my car and visibility was limited.

That was enough of my sightseeing trip there and I returned to Yachats to keep an eye on the trees near my house as the wind was ripping through them with an eerie sound. All the way back to Yachats I saw shore pine trees that had been blown apart by the wind gusts, branches snapped like twigs.

It’s easy to become used to the rather tame weather we’d been having when this sudden onslaught of wildness hit so I dutifully brought in more firewood, checked all my emergency supplies and battened down the hatches!

Of course we’ve all seen the pictures from Portland and all over the rest of the Northwest of homes sliding, being buried and flooded. Not pretty pictures to say the least so let’s all think positive thoughts for all the folks that have been impacted by this and hopefully when you read this we will have re-acquainted ourselves with sunshine and maybe, just maybe, we’ll all be able to go outside once again and enjoy the great outdoors with Mother Natures blessing!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Joy in Duck and Beaverville!

As I sit writing this the rain and wind is pelting the windows and the trees are howling, the birds are grounded and 2009 is here. It’s a glorious day in Oregon on the Central Oregon Coast, a true storm watchers delight.

But despite the conditions outside and the less than spectacular 2008 there is joy in the air. Both the University of Oregon Ducks and the Oregon State Beavers were victors in their respective post season football bowl games, the Ducks in the Holiday Bowl in San Diego and the Beavers in the Sun Bowl in El Paso Texas.

While neither of these bowls decided the National Championship they are prestigious bowls and do wonders for the schools as far as promoting the school on national television and recruitment of students who hopefully will excel in their studies and learn from existing in outstanding collegiate environments. Incidentally the state of Oregon also gets a tremendous amount of publicity nationally as all the play by play commentators continually mentioned the state and its great features.

Another reason for joy in Duck and Beaverville is the pride both coaches Mike Bellotti of Oregon and Mike Riley of Oregon State must feel with these victories. In mid season there was public questioning when it was announced that a successor to Bellotti was in place when Bellotti steps aside. The question was, “Is he getting ready to be out the door? Maybe he has been around too long.” Well that was shot down with Oregon’s win and Bellotti once again being revived as a great coach.

Then there was Mike Riley whose team had upset the might Southern California Trojans on the strength of the Rodgers brothers; Jacquizz and James and their tremendous games. Then the bubble burst and Jacquizz went down with an injury then James also went down and both were unable to play in the Sun Bowl. The University of Oregon trounced Oregon State in the Civil War game and it looked like the Beavers were about to fall apart.

However Riley, who stresses teamwork, managed to replace the brothers with other players and adjusted the game plan to fit the replacement players. In the end the defense held their opponent Pitt at bay and Justin Kahut kicked a field goal and the Beavers mustered it up to come away victorious.

Both of the teams followed their coach’s plans to the letter and all of us in Oregon weather a Duck or Beaver should applaud both programs and let this little bit of joy carry us through the coming winter!

Stay warm and dry and here is to a great 2009.

~ email yarick@pioneer.net ~


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Recently in Yachats there was a dark cloud hanging over the community. A series of burglaries in the area had residents on edge. This was not the first time something like this had taken place in Yachats, it had occurred about ten years ago, and Waldport residents had their hands full with a similar scenario several years ago. However in recent times residents had gone back to the peace and tranquility they were used too and were caught off guard by this latest crime wave. Ironically the burglaries had all taken place without forced entry with the exception of one break in where window screens over open windows were pried off. In fact in a couple of the burglaries the victims were at home at the time, just in a different part of the house or asleep. The victims hadn’t locked their doors or shut their windows tight but that’s not unusual in a village like Yachats where normally it’s quite safe.

But this ugly reality caused shock waves in Yachats and Waldport and the surrounding areas, who or whom was behind this random thievery?

As it turns out after some strong detective work by the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Department and anonymous tips from citizens they arrested a 17 year old Yachats youth and charged him with several counts of burglary. He currently is residing in the Lincoln County Juvenile Detention Center.

Now it’s not clear if he acted alone, or with accomplices, but the ominous cloud has been lifted and residents can once again concentrate on things other than trying to solve the crimes and recover their stolen goods.

It’s a real shame in another sense because before the arrest citizens were mumbling about “teenagers” on the loose and that’s an inaccurate portrayal of the majority of teenagers in Yachats, Waldport, Seal Rock and other areas of the coast. The bulk of the teenagers are productive, respectful, and helpful in their communities and the kind of teenagers we should be proud of.

So this cloud that has been lifted hopefully will let the sunshine in to shine on the good youth and let the area residents once again bask in the warmth and safety of their community.

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

It’s that time of year!

That’s one of my favorite sentences and I use it often. It’s time for baseball, football, swimming, cooking, camping, skiing and other activities etc. In fact I probably write at least five or six columns a year with that theme and here comes another one!

It’s that time of year to connect with family, friends and other acquaintances and find out what’s been going on with them. In Yachats and Waldport the opportunities to run into friends and acquaintances is easy this time of year since several of the restaurants have holiday parties for their patrons and the Lions and other service clubs have holiday get-togethers. Since the populations of these places are fairly small it’s not hard to see everyone you know!

However if your family and other friends and acquaintances aren’t within visiting distance you’ve got to use other means of catching up with them. In the past it was mostly via mail, the snail mail variety. Nowadays it’s more likely to be by phone or email. Christmas cards still are mailed and arriving bearing news and greetings, but a phone conversation or email can cover a lot more territory.

Nevertheless, it is the time of year to connect and I did just that with an old friend and co-worker from the past. He lives in California and he and I spent many years together in rock and roll bands. Several times of year we speak and have visited each other many times both here in Oregon and in California but at this time of year, the Christmas holiday season, we always have a long conversation talking about all the different guys and gals we played in bands with. Amazingly out of about forty people we played with in various bands and several agents and managers who handled us about eighty percent of them are still connected in one way or another. The musicians all have their network of close friends and they are amongst ours also so between the two of us we can place all the people and provide a little info about them. That’s also true with the business folks, most of them still work with each other in some way, so that’s an easy group to keep up with.

It’s always a great conversation because it will start with “remember Vern from Grand Junction?’ That will lead to “yeah he was friends with Billy the drummer in that band who I just spoke with yesterday. He got a hold of me thru my web page and was trying to get Georges number. I called him and we talked for a half hour and he filled me in on Mantor and the rest of those guys.”

It goes on like that every time and by the end of the conversation I feel like I’m back hanging out with all those people who are friends in our lives.

It’s a nice feeling to know that each of you probably have a similar network of acquaintances that with a little bit of effort you can get in touch with. Today it is a lot easier to keep in touch because of technology and I appreciate it a lot and I hope you do as well as I’m sure people would love to hear from you and shot the breeze a bit!

Have fun connecting and stay warm!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

College Memories

This time of year with all the college football bowl games I usually recall memories of the time I spent going to college. I was fresh out of the Air Force and attended Sacramento City College then Sacramento State College where I played football for one year. Years later I attended Oregon Coast Community College in Newport and studied writing.

I still keep in contact with several people I met going to college and occasionally will see others when they come to visit the Oregon coast. In fact one old college buddy lives in Yachats as I do and we chat and reminisce from time to time about the old days in school.

Other than that I don’t spend much time thinking about college but recently I had to do a lot of thinking about it.

A friend of mine mentioned there was a need for a substitute teacher at an educational facility near Yachats on a temporary basis. I spend a good deal of time writing and interviewing people for the paper but I thought this could be something that would fit into my schedule and I’d be able to lend a hand at the facility with the students.

I got the information I needed to fill out an application and began the process which in this situation is all done by computer on line. After hours of negotiating the web site and filling in the needed information I finally got the application completed and according to the web site had done it correctly. I was then told that my application would go to the main office of the facility for review and I would hear back via email.

A couple weeks passed and one day I got an email stating that I had been approved and I would hear from the human resources department as to what the next step would be. A few more days went by and yesterday morning I received a call from a woman in human resources and she informed me that to complete the process I needed to produce all my college transcripts to verify that I’d attended. Well I don’t have copies of my transcripts so I had to contact all three colleges, fill out request forms and mail them to the appropriate school. Since I’d first attended college in the late sixties it’s been quite awhile since I’ve contacted the schools but fortunately they all have web sites so I got all the phone numbers and addresses and after all afternoon of filling out request forms I made it to the post office just as they were picking up the mail to send it off.

So now my memories of college include seeking my records. Before they were memories of football games, parties, girls, all night cram courses and other Animal House type memories. I must say those memories bring a smile to my face but talking to the admissions and records department isn’t going to be one of my more fond ones!!

Word to the wise; it might be handy to keep a copy of your college transcripts, you never know when you’ll need them!

Contact Rick Schultze Via E-Mail


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Yachats is a perfect place to spend a festive holiday season for many reasons. There are good restaurants, and bistros, lodging facilities, walking trails and a park, churches and access to several great beaches. As long as I can recall with the kickoff at Thanksgiving and running through New Years day there have been people visiting Yachats from all over the country and many countries outside of the USA.

Personally my self and my girlfriend have had various family members from other places come for a holiday visit and its fun to see folks kick back and enjoy the village which is a very hospitable place. In fact many of our families have made acquaintances with village residents at the market, the coffee shops, and other gathering places so it’s often a bit of a mini-reunion with old acquaintances re-connecting.

However, this year is different and it’s mostly because of several factors with the leading one being the tenuous economy. Our long distance friends and relatives who generally fly to Portland or Eugene from California, Colorado, and Canada have been watching the air fares soar only to read recently that due to the lack of passengers caused some of the airlines to cut prices. That’s great if you can suddenly change your travel plans, arrange for time off and re-book car rentals and hotel rooms.

But we’re just the kind of people that have to plan and budget well in advance so that hasn’t been much of a help. For other friends and relatives it’s been the cost of gasoline that put them off and now as gas prices drop they have already made other plans to stay more local. Sure we will have friends and relatives who live in Oregon that will visit but it will likely be short visits as opposed to a week stay at the beach.

Don’t get me wrong, we are still going to have a great holiday season but this year it will be different. Fortunately all of our families are computer connected so chatting with one another and sharing photos is easy to do and sometimes it’s more fun since there are several young children in the mix that love to email and receive emails. There will be more gifts and goodies being mailed this year and I’m sure more greeting cards too. For me that’s great because my girlfriend who is a food writer and great baker will have the house smelling delicious for quite awhile. Hopefully I will be able to contain my test tasting and keep my waist line in check!

But we will miss the camaraderie of the missing visitors and the pleasure of showing off the village and its residents. Perhaps next holiday season we will be back on track and people can have the luxury of having both time and money to plan their holiday coastal getaway. In fact that is my Christmas wish besides peace and goodwill towards one another; just let us get back to being able to getaway for holiday visits with family and friends.

I sincerely hope you can if you want to!!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The most popular of the ancient pagan celebrations was this, the "birthday of the Unconquered Sun". An anniversary painlessly transferred in early Christian times to the birth of Christ, biblical evidence suggests a date to the contrary. Astronomically speaking, it is Midwinter. On December 21st, 2008 at 7:04 AM EST, the Sun will reach its lowest point up off the horizon at local high noon, and from this day on until the June Solstice, it will only climb higher in our sky, bringing warmth and life to the Earth. The Romans celebrated the Solstice on December 25th, and the preceding week was the Saturnalia, a raucous week of merrymaking, social revelling and debauchery. Try as they might, the Medieval Church never did get rid of all of the paganism attached to the holiday.


Winter Solstice 2008
Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Help I’m being bombarded!!

When I sit back and take a look and things going on around me these days I have to smile a "rye" smile. I spent years in the music business where things run at a frenetic pace and there are more crises daily than in a week on a good soap opera. But you get used to that and literally roll with the punches and go with the flow.

However a few years ago I decided to leave that chaotic world behind and re-locate to my home state of Oregon and the Village of Yachats to pursue other ventures. The calmness of the Oregon coast, the pleasure of knowing great people and having super neighbors and enjoying the peace and quiet of Yachats has an allure that is hard to beat.

As one who wanted to be a writer this is a perfect place and it’s afforded me the treasured hours to quietly work uninterrupted. Of course I also am aware that there is a “real” world out there that is still churning along and that events; militarily, economical and political occur on a daily basis but it seems to me, and maybe it’s just me, that recently the “real” world has become somewhat tilted!

Of course there was the phenomenal flurry of political re-alignment that keep us all buried with junk mail and commercials, then following that was the deepening economic crisis that has touched each and every one of us. The war and the debates over bailouts and stimulus programs fill the airwaves and have worked their way into even the simplest conversations.

Those are some heavy bombs that are ready to blow and just when you try to take cover you get bombarded by the continual sales events in conjunction with the holiday season. It’s a paradox; supposedly no one has any money yet there are more sales than ever including a special cyber day where online merchants are offering deep discounts. It’s like being in a boxing ring with a super fast puncher. You’re watching out for the right hand then the left one pops you!

I don’t think the sales this year are going to have the participation they have had in the past but when I went to the market today it was one busy store. Everyone I ran into seemed to be on a mission similar to mine. Let’s get our stuff and get on back to the home front where for a little while we can enjoy the peace and tranquility we came to Yachats and the surrounding communities for. Just for once let the bombs quit falling for a little while so we can enjoy life on the Central Oregon coast and pass on some goodwill to our families, friends and neighbors.

Contact Rick Schultze by E-Mail


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Last week I wrote about being called to Jury duty. Well this will be about the trial which was a domestic case with the defendant being accused of causing physical harm to a child who was part of his household in front of other children. The terms reckless endangerment, knowingly causing harm, and other such pleasant phrases peppered the courtroom as both the defense and prosecution got down to the task at hand; to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant had hurt the child.

The prosecution went first with his presentation of what he planed to do including mentioning the number of witnesses he planed to call to the witness stand including the child in question and several other children who allegedly witnessed the incident and had given statements to the authorities. He made mention of the peace officers he was going to call and that since there were children that were going to testify he couldn’t say for sure their testimony would match the statements they’d given. He also noted that the mother of the injured child seemed to lean towards reconciling with the defendant.

At this point the case against the defendant seemed pretty cut and dry. In a nutshell; the defendant had retrieved a video game toy the child was trying to take to school against his mothers wishes. During the retrieving process the defendant had allegedly twisted and pulled the child’s hand throwing him to the ground. The hand had become very painful and swollen and that swelling was noticed at a junior league football practice by the coach who is a peace officer and reported leading to the child being taken to the emergency room for X-rays and treatment.

The first kink in the case came when a witness; a neighbor child who is friend of the injured child discounted the prior testimony of the peace officers to the shock of many of the jurors. As it turned out the rest of the children who testified changed their stories as well and it became obvious that they had been told to do so. It was sad to see these kids under such scrutiny in front of strangers stumbling through answers. As it turned out the mother who later testified in a vague way had left the defendant for another man and that didn’t work out so with the defendant out of the picture she and her kids would be basically homeless.

After the verdict; guilty on one count, we the jury all agreed that the victims in this sad scenario were the two children who lived with the defendant at the time of the incident. Already they had been placed in the unenviable position of having to choose between a lie and a home. It’s a situation that could possibly be playing out in other courtrooms today and as the judge said after the trial when asked what will happen to the children, “that’s a million dollar question, they probably will be retuned to their mother”.

When the jurors said goodbye to one another the one thing all twelve of us agreed on was that we should all be aware of the fragility of children when their lives are in the hands of reckless and irresponsible adults, the forced lies in this case after all had come out of the mouths of some of those children.

To reach Rick Schultze email:yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Image from peterdinardi.comWhen the envelope from the county arrived I figured it was the property tax notice but I was wrong. It was the letter summoning me to Jury Duty.

I’d been summoned once before but at that time I’d just had a hip replacement operation and they gave me a deferment. Well, time had passed so this was the summons that I had to respond to, which I did, and I received a set of instructions including a phone number to call and a Juror number which was 123. So at the beginning of the month I began the daily process of calling in to see if I’d been scheduled to report and after a week of not being called, I was, and reported bright and early on a rainy and windy Wednesday morning.

Now it got interesting, I was one in a pool of about 100 potential Jurors.

As I stood in the hallway of the courthouse I recognized several of my fellow Yachats residents and before the official check in began we all had a chance to chat and tell our stories about being called. It was better than running in to each other at the Post Office; a new setting and a lot of potential drama!

Finally the Jury coordinator appeared and from behind a table covered with forms informed us to come forward, find our name and number, pick up a pamphlet on Jury rules, and a Jury badge. After each potential Juror had signed in the process of selection began with the coordinator calling out one series of numbers and sending them to one court room and sending the balance to another adjoining court room.

I headed to the first court room being in the first group and after the rest of the group arrived the second step of the choosing process began with another drawing of numbers and once again my number was called so I took a seat in the Jury box and the balance of the group filled the courtroom benches.

Then the fun began. The Judge on the bench addressed the gathering and told us the trial we’d been called for was a criminal trial and gave us a brief outline of what it was going to be about. Then the Judge asked for anyone who felt uncomfortable about the issues, knew the defendant or potential witnesses, or had connections with the law enforcement agencies to speak up. After a lengthy process of people speaking up several potential Jurors were excused and the elimination process began again. Finally 24 of us adjourned to the Jury room and several minutes later we were called back into the chambers and 13 of us were called by name. I was one of the 13 and within minutes I was sworn in and began my adventure of being a Juror on a criminal trial; the state of Oregon versus an individual. We broke for lunch and after the introduction of the State’s attorney and the defense attorney and instructions from the judge, the action began. I’d answered the call to duty and next week I’ll tell you all about it.

Click to Email Rick Schultze


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Well your mail box should be a lot less cluttered with stuff now that the election is over. The signs will disappear and the amount of commercials jamming the airwaves will revert back to the regular things; cars, food, beer, clothes and other items. However, soon to fill the spots the political commercials vacated will be the Christmas shopping commercials. It seems that some things never change, but after this national election and the selection of a new President the world as we knew it has changed.

Never before has there been such interest and such an outpouring of emotions as we just witnessed. Oh there have been some Presidential elections that caught the countries attention but this one takes the cake. If you saw any interviews with people from around the country it was clear that there was jubilation from some and a sense of sadness from others, but everyone had been paying attention and that is what elections are supposed to be about. If you wanted to voice your opinion you had the chance and the masses did just that. To say the future of this country and the world will be different is a fair statement and regardless of what happens things are going to change.

Now bringing it back down to our coastal towns, villages and rural communities there will also be changes. In Yachats there will be a new Mayor, city council members, and the fire district will see the results of two bonds which passed.

Compared to the national election those changes seem insignificant but when a village like Yachats gets a new Mayor and city council members it’s a big deal because everyone knows the current Mayor and will be watching with interest to see how the Mayor elect carries on. Of course those same sets of curious eyes will be watching the new makeup of the city council. With the fire district we will rest assured that our fire protection services will continue to operate with their high degree of proficiency.

But instead of being bombarded by the national news media about the new changes at city hall we villagers will find out lots by reading the local paper, visiting the local coffee shops, service club gatherings, churches, and watering holes. There will be a plethora opinions and second guessing and in a little community that all usually manages to reach everyone, young and old.

So I think it would be fair to say that as of November 4th 2008 we the people are about to embark on an exciting new journey that appears to be based on changes!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Full Moon of November was called in Colonial times the Frosty or Snow Moon. The Hopi Indians knew it as the Initiate Moon, the Algonquin called it the Beaver Moon, and the Lakota Sioux called it the Moon of the Falling Leaves.


November's Moon
Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch
Leonid Meteor Shower

On the night of November 16th/17th the Leonid Meteor Shower will peak in the wee hours of the morning. This shower is maddeningly unpredictable.

In 1933, it was described as 'like a child's sparkler held against the sky.' In 1966 it burst forth over the central western states in the greatest meteor display in recorded history. In other years, it has failed to show up at all.


November Skies
Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Stuck in the Middle.

There was a popular song released in 1973 titled “Stuck in the Middle with You” by Stealers Wheel; a Scottish folk/rock band. Well, yesterday I wasn’t stuck in the middle of anything except the two Taco Bell restaurants that were giving away free Tacos thanks to the Tampa Bay Rays Shortstop Jason Bartlett. His stolen base in the fifth inning on October 22nd during the opening game of the World Series meant that the fast-food dining chain would hand out a free taco, one per person between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m on October 28th.

Last year Oregon native Jacoby Ellsbury of the Boston Red Sox won the tacos for the country and I happened to be in Portland on that magic day. It was the perfect scenario and like many, my girlfriend Crystal and I managed to hit several Taco Bell’s for free Tacos handed out with a smile by some of Taco Bell’s 135,000 troops behind the counters that day. We weren’t as bold as customers at other locations who were more creative in inflating a free light taco into a pig-out meal. A group of teen-agers in Wilmington, Del., received their first free item in drive-though windows of one Taco Bell, and then got a second by standing in line inside the store. The repeated the process at several outlets “until they couldn’t eat any more.” said Jose Cofino, the vice president of Taco Bell’s East Coast zone.

In the Chelten Avenue Taco Bell in Philadelphia, Mr. Cofino, like many company managers elsewhere, found himself working behind the counter when “300 teen-agers came right into our store at 3 p.m. when the Picketts Middle School let out,” he said. And in Pennsauken, N.J., “at 3:50 P. M. our manager looked up to see the entire Pennsauken High School track team enter the store, literally running for the Border,” Mr. Cofino said. The extravaganza cost Taco Bell $8 to $12 million for labor and food. In addition, the company spent nearly $4 million on television advertising during the weekend to hawk the promotion and to me it seemed like it was well worth it because at each Taco Bell we hit a large number of people were getting more than just one free taco which the company estimated to be worth about 91 cents. But it was fun and the employees seemed to be having a great time even though they were hustling like mad to keep up with the hungry crowds. People were into the spirit of the event so it was more like a party atmosphere than just a visit to a fast food restaurant.

However this year I was stuck. Living in Yachats I’m exactly between Newport 30 miles to the North, and Florence 30 miles to the south and the only Taco Bell’s around are in those two locations. I pondered my dilemma; a 60 mile round trip for a 91 cent taco was hardly economical. I racked my brain for any legitimate reason to go to either location; a doctors appointment, to have my vehicle serviced, to do a weekly “big shopping” trip and other reasons, but couldn’t come up with any. I gave it my best shot and had I been more prepared probably could have found a reason but decided to wait until next Monday when I have to report for jury duty in Newport to make my way to Taco Bell. I know I won’t get my free Taco this year but I’ll buy a Taco to support the promotion which I think puts a bit of fun and frivolity in to the World Series even for those who don’t watch baseball. No one I know is going to pass getting a free treat!!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net

Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

That’s a good question; one that was frequently asked in the 1960’s when people met for the first time. The old joke was that the first three questions asked were; do you have a job, do you have an apartment, and what is your sign? Oh boy you had to hope your signs were compatible or the conversation could quickly end; after all Sidney Omarr and his popular Sun Sign books and horoscope columns were the way to go!

However, Mr. Omarr passed away on January 2nd 2003 leaving the Sun Sign folks on their own. But not to fear, signage is still a vital entity in today’s culture especially this time of year; it’s political season.

Traversing between Yachats and Waldport one can see a plethora of colorful signs. There are bright blue ones, white ones, red and white ones, red, white and blue ones and those are just signs for candidates or measures on the ballot for the November 4th elections. Of course what separates these signs from Mr. Omarr’s signs is their random placement. When someone asked what your Sun Sign was you had to tell them but with these political signs it’s often very hard to tell who put it there, or is that the personal opinion of someone who may or may not live where the sign has been placed? Then of course are the signs nailed to trees or posts in the middle of nowhere! Who put them there? Whose sign is it?

Putting the political signs away for a moment I was taken by the amount of other signs vying for my attention. Those would be the entering a Tsunami Zone and leaving a Tsunami Zone signs, the for sale signs by so and so reality, or by the owner, and the for rent signs which pop up for brief periods of time, especially in Yachats.

Then as the weekends approach the highways and byways are dotted with garage sale and estate sale signs. These signs actually do seem to get peoples attention, check out the number of cars parked by the sale sites! Other signs spotted on a regular basis are the no spray signs, the no hunting signs, the no trespassing signs, and of course the ever popular no parking signs.

I know that after the election the political signs will be taken down and hopefully put in some far away place but the other signs will probably be around for a long time as long as there are Tsunami Zones, homes for sale, stuff for sale, trespassers, hunters, and sprayers and renters looking to rent. It’s a fact of life, a sign is a statement meant for you to see and so far my favorite is on an automotive repair shop in Waldport; it says, “Sorry I’m Open”. Now that’s a good sign, what is yours?

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

When Movie was a BandWhen I was a kid I used to read a columnist whose column was called “once around the barber pole”. It referred to the days when the barber shop served as a kind of community gathering spot where guys would sit around and swap adventure stories; discuss politics, current events, sports, the weather and other timely subjects. Well those days are gone but this week I’m going write this column like he did; a little adventure story if you will, I’m sure you’ve had your fill of current events and political stories without going to a barber shop!

So as we go “once around the barber pole” it will be the little adventure I took today after I logged my morning emails. As I’ve mentioned before I just released a book; When Movie Was A Band, and today I ventured out of Yachats and headed north through Waldport, Seal Rock, South Beach, Newport, and Depoe Bay on my way to Lincoln City. I had ventured south to Florence and Mapleton the day before. The reason? To put the book into the local book stores.

Now this is normally done by a distribution company when you are a major author with an established publishing company. However this is a grass roots operation done the old fashioned way. A box of books in the trunk, a list of stores and a smile on your face. The first book stores to stock the book were in Yachats but once out of the friendly confines of the village it becomes more of a challenge and Florence, Newport, and Lincoln City are definitely bigger. Since Yachats has no traffic lights or one way streets a little updating of driving skills is required before leaving but since the tourist season is pretty much over I managed to navigate my way around these larger metropolises safely. Then came the part that requires a bit more attention; finding the stores and introducing myself to the proprietor!

There are a couple ways to place books in a store. The best, but most unlikely for an unknown author, is to sell copies to the store at a discount so they can turn around and sell the book for a small profit. The other way is to leave the book on consignment and split the price with the store.

Well I found the stores on my list and negotiated terms with them and in fact got suggestions from a couple stores on which were the best ones to visit. It was an interesting adventure; the book store proprietors all were great, helpful, fair and enthusiastic that is all but two of them who shall remain nameless. Those two were the owners of stores that do not handle new books. They only deal with used books and the look of distain on their faces when looking at a new book was clear. In their world new represents something that might not sell, however, what they stock has worked once before and now they are trying to sell it again.

They kind of reminded me of the customers that walked into the barber shop when the talk was at an energetic level with tales flying about, and as soon as they walked in the talk screeched to a halt! They just didn’t have the spirit of adventure about them!

Needless to say I enjoyed a fun adventure with good results, even with the economic chaos getting all the attention these days it was great to talk to people about books, new or used, in Yachats and the many other fine towns and cities. Apparently regardless of what’s going on around us, it’s still a great time to read!!

So the next time I visit Robin the Barber in Waldport, this will be my contribution to “once around the barber pole”.

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Friends in need have friends indeed.

In Lincoln and Lane Counties over time there have been situations that have called for communities to come together to provide support for one of their members. These communities big and small all have shared one thing; when times have called for it, we’ve stood by one another.

I’ve lived in several states here in the west in big cities and although there are plenty of situations that call out for help they often go unnoticed because of the sheer size of the cities and the number of people. It seems like every day there is something happening and unfortunately many get lost in the shuffle of big city life.

However here, and I’m speaking about Lincoln county and Yachats specifically, there is a situation that warrants all of our help and concerned people are doing something about it.

Imagine a leisurely drive to work at a resort restaurant on a Friday in late August with expectations of another good night in the middle of the tourist season. Suddenly out of nowhere a vehicle traveling at high speed operated by an allegedly alcohol impaired driver plows directly into you, killing him and sending you into a life that will require a tremendous amount of rehabilitation, time, expense and help from family and friends. Not something someone would wish for I can guarantee you.

However, that is precisely what happened to Yachats resident Michele Osterhoudt, a waitress at the Adobe Hotel and Resort restaurant. A long time Lincoln county resident who had resided in Newport but had moved to Yachats and was finally settled into her new dwelling not far from the Adobe. It was a perfect situation, close to work and working where she enjoyed her co-workers and patrons. Witnesses of the accident said it was a miracle she even survived the carnage and for days friends, family, co-workers and neighbors held their breath as she battled for her life.

Today she is in rehabilitation and on the slow and painstaking road to recovery but as one can imagine, it will be a tough road. Her insurance has been tapped out and the other drivers can’t be accessed for some time.

Consequently on Sunday October 26th there will be benefit for Michele at the Yachats Lions Club. It will run from 3:00 p.m to 7:00 p.m and promises to be a great event.

For this benefit Yachats, Waldport, Seal Rock and surrounding communities including Newport have come together. The Yachats Lions are donating use of the hall, donations for items to be auctioned off have been coming in from community members, the musical entertainment will be provided for no charge by noted musicians from the area; Big Steve & The Usual Suspects; Steve Hohn, Terry Walton, and Randy Madnick, and musical guests Mona McCrea, Ray Vance, Neal Staufenbeil, Steve Cook and Chris Lauer. Food will be provided by a plethora of community members as well as the help in setting up the hall, serving food, cleaning the hall, and distribution of the flyers announcing the event. All of the help and effort is being done from the heart of these people and once again signifies the strength and dedication these communities have when it comes to lending a helping hand.

Michele Osterhoudt didn’t plan on getting run into head-on by an out of control piece of machinery, and the members of her community are trying to do their very best to help her overcome the tremendous hurdles she will be facing.

Please support this cause if at all possible, it will be greatly appreciated.

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

As fall arrives Oregon explodes with Roadside Farm Stands and Farmers Markets. Recently on a trip to Portland from Yachats and back my girlfriend and I and were struck by how many farm stands and markets we saw. I got to wondering just how many there are in Oregon and specifically how many in Lincoln and Lane counties. According to the 2008 Oregon Farm Direct Nutrition Program there are twenty four in Lane County with two being in Florence and eight in Lincoln County with two being in Yachats. In addition to terrific selections of beautiful produce, vegetables, flowers and other goodies some of the markets and farms have great names. Names like Sweet Things by Ariene, Peerless Produce, LLC, Ruby & Amber's Organic Oasis, Thistledown Farms, Barking Dog Farms and Seeds of Oregon-Kauffman Farms.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Holloween is going to suck this year!

Throughout history, the last night of October was traditionally celebrated as the eve of Winter by the ancient Celts... and the beginning of their New Year. In ancient Ireland a new and sacred fire was kindled on this night, from which all the fires of Ireland would be lit. The Celts believed this date a crack in time, when the dead could revisit the living.

Astronomically, we are midway between the Autumnal Equinox and the Winter Solstice, the year's quarter days. The Sun is now rising half-way down on the southeastern horizon towards the point at which it will rise in the dead of Winter. It is a cross-quarter day, and one of peculiar significance. This was the ancient pagan Feast of the Dead, when all sorts of things went bump (and sometimes more) in the night.


Halloween
Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch
Happy Birthday Rick

Well, summer is winding down which is always a bit of a let down for me; it starts getting dark earlier, more rain and wind and this summer even though a bit wet, has been a good one here on the coast according to visitors to Yachats and Waldport and Florence that have enjoyed their visits or “staycations” as Oregonians call their visits when they’ve stayed within the state and have visited the state parks, the coast, the mountains and the many neat small towns they’ve missed before. And then there were the Olympics, nothing short of spectacular despite some dire predictions of them being a mess politically and environmentally.


Football Season 2008
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The full Moon of October is called "The Hunter's Moon". The ancient Greeks identified the Moon with Diana, goddess of the hunt. The Sioux called October's Moon The Dying Grass Moon. In China, it is the tradition to eat 'mooncakes' about the time of this full Moon (or September's, depending on their lunar calendar), to mark the fall of the Mongol Yuan dynasty in 1368. Rebel messages were concealed in these cakes, which were filled with nuts and candied sweets. They say it is this Moon which ties lovers together with invisible threads. Have a mooncake together.


Hunter's Moon
Category: SkyWatch
Posted by: feltch

Let The Sunshine In

As is often the case hearing a song will bring back memories and recently I heard the 1969 hit "Let The Sunshine in" by the Fifth Dimension from the musical Hair. Actually it was part of a medley "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine in" and it was number one on the Billboard Hot 100 for six weeks and certified Platinum with over a million in sales.

The song was an exuberant, feel good tune and when I heard it the other day it was a perfect fit. It was a sun drenched day and it was as if someone in the universe had shouted "recess" for all to hear.

On the coast where I live February is not necessarily known as a head to the beach type month like the summer months are. The highways and beaches are generally fairly quiet and storms are frequent, but in this case you could say it just happened to be a perfect scenario for a party. President's weekend was beginning and suddenly the highways were crowded with people heading for the sunny beaches, the restaurants and motels were overflowing, and coastal dwellers used to the quiet of the off season were shaken awake by eager people out having a blast.

The normally empty parking lots and turnouts to the beaches and beach access roads were packed. The beach across the river from where I live looked like the beach in the middle of July or August. People with colorful clothing, beach gear and happy canines were frolicking about like kids on a school field trip. I watched in amazement as the sleepy little shops suddenly were filled with curious beach goers.

The Village Market was overflowing and the biggest motels in town were hanging out the No Vacancy signs. It was great to see. My village is a tourist driven location and a shot in the arm to the economy during mid-winter is very welcome believe me. Like ski resorts that live and die with snow or the lack of it; a beach town needs sun and fun to make ends meet.

Today as I sit writing this the sun has disappeared once again, the clouds are back, the drizzle will begin soon and the local work force is catching their breath after working their fannies off but there are smiles all around. It had been a wonderful "recess" for what appears to have been a whole lot of Oregon and Washington residents and as the chorus of "Let The Sunshine in" echoes off of the coastal hills I can feel the good times of sunny days!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Sun FlowersI love this time of year. It¹s the time when autumn returns and with her all of her favorite friends: red, orange and golden leaves swirling in on the chilly breeze. Early sunset and crisp fall smell comes along with pumpkins, berries and tall corn. My favorite of all of autumn¹s friends is the tall beautiful bright yellow sunflower.

According to Greek myth, the sunflower originated with the sea nymph Clytie, Helios¹s lover until he deserted her and she died of a broken heart. After her death, Clytie changed into a sunflower, whose face always turned toward Helios, following him on his journeys across the sky. Sunflowers really do turn their heads to watch the sun cross the sky.

 


Crystal's "Run-For-The-School-Bus" Muffins
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

When you hear the term "Indian Summer" folks are referring to the name given to a period of sunny, warm weather in autumn, not long before winter. Indian summer can be in September like it is now, but can also occur in October or even early November and it can persist for a few days or extend to week or more. It is a beautiful time of year and this year it seems to be showing off the beauty of several central Oregon coast spots.

Beginning with Seal Rock which is featured on the cover of this month's issue of Oregon Coast Magazine. In a great article written by Waldport resident Barbara B. Covell, Seal Rock is highlighted and noted for its amazing beach area. It is hard to pass through Seal Rock when the tide is out and not notice all the tide pools and rock formations. As I'm sure many of you have noticed, traffic does slow to a crawl as folks pull over to capture those sights their cameras. Continuing south and crossing the Alsea Bay Bridge into Waldport the sights continue to impress.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: feltch


Some music is background music; you know it's there, but just there. Some music is "art" or "folk music", a quiet kind of music, then there is "Urgent music"; music that calls for some kind of action, immediate action!

Urgent music has long been associated with Rock and Roll, but it's actually as old as music itself. Back in the days of the cave boys with clubs and drums, the sounds they were producing were calling for action now! "Let's get going! Tribal music has always been Urgent and even the early folk singers were beseeching people to take action.

Rock and Roll does have its share of Urgent music, in fact in 1981 the Rock band Foreigner had a single titled "Urgent" that went to #4 on Billboard Magazines charts and the album the single was on sold 6 million copies and there was also a Rock and Roll band from New York called Urgent and it's no different today!

I remember listening to singles in the late fifties heavily laden with Urgent messages and suggestions. Later folk groups called for change and action against the "man. Today there is so much more music than back then and the method of delivery is different, but the Urgent theme is still there. Since you don't go to a record stores to check out songs today and can download and store an amazing amount of music on iPods and Apples' iTunes software and the new iPhones, the Urgent factor has to grab someone's attention right away and the "want to hear that again factor has to kick in right now!

Recently I received an email about a new song on free.napster.com and its Urgent factor caught my attention. The singer sees signs pointing to the end of the world being near and lets us know what is ahead and that he wants to be a pop star before it all comes crashing down! He Urgently wants his name in lights, to be with a starlet shooting the moon, and becoming the Hollywood stereotype having a blast!

This may not be the message our forefathers sang, and drummed about in their day, but this singer sees something and is telling the rest of us to beware!

It's a good, infectious, song and I can't imagine anything being more Urgent than having a big blast before the world ends with a big blast!!

The song co-written by Louie Lawent and performed by Billy Livesay, former guitarist from the Clarence Clemons Band, is titled Pop Star and can be listened to on Http://free.napster.com/view/artist/index.html?id=12351878. "Pop Star will then be there and just click "Play (it's on the left) and check it out!

Speaking of blasts I hope you all had one on the 4th of July!!!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

HoneyIn The very beginning, there was honey. The "gods" sustained them selves entirely on honey alone as they created the universe. In Indian myth the Savins, the twin horsemen of the sun god Surya, acquired honey from celestial bees and brought it down to earth in a three-wheeled cart called a madhu-valhana.

The sanctity of honey may stem from the myths of the Mordvinian Ugro Finns story of a chief God, chkai, a bisexual king bee responsible for creating the human race. These people believed that humans came from bees, they envisioned the earth as a beehive, ruled by the bee God chkai who laid eggs from which all bees and creating goddesses were born.

 


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

A free Taco for everyone!

free tacosWell that happened thanks to native Oregonian Jacoby Ellsbury, from Madras who is an outfielder for The World Champion Boston Red Sox. He made it happen as part of the "Steal a base, Steal a Taco" promotion by stealing the first base of the World Series in the 4th inning of the second game. With that Taco Bell set a date for the following Tuesday from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm where anyone could go into a Taco Bell and get a free Taco.

It’s estimated that 8 million were given away costing Taco Bell between 8 and 12 million dollars plus 4 million to advertise the "unprecedented marketing event" on TV.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Crystal

What have you heard today? Even though I live in a small village that doesn't mean I'm out of the mainstream of what's going on in the rest of the world. It might seem like that if you're walking on a deserted beach with no other souls in site but there is electricity available and that means television, phones, computers, and the Internet at a touch of a finger should you so desire.

There are some who come to live here or vacation here that shun that aspect of life but since I'm in the newspaper business I use all of the aforementioned devices to keep track of what's happening. I have different approaches to hearing my daily updates but one of them is to listen to Jim Rome, a radio and television host. He's categorized as a sports talk guy but his interviews frequently range to subjects definitely not about sports per se.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Early bottle used for champagneIt's a strange thing, time, and what I find remarkable is this is the one and only time that nearly every man women and child is watching the time at exactly the same time. The anticipation builds with a mad search for the right thing to wear the right place to wear it, and the right person to kiss at the stroke of midnight. We all count down to that special moment when all is new again; that time when the world for a brief moment will be truly happy. And what of course is the only libation worthy of such a moment? Champagne! It's become a superstition. There are those who are afraid that if they don't bless the New Year with a glass of the bubbly, the year will be cursed.

For centuries Champagne has sat upon the thrown in the kingdom of wine. Sparkling wines were introduced in France in 1535. It was in the beginning of the 1700's that a young scientist named Christopher Merrett discovered the process of secondary fermentation of wine to effect carbonation. The result is that Champagne is a sparkling wine produced in the bottle. The Champagne was a success, but the bottling process was a nightmare. The glass was too thin and the corks were too weak to handle the pressure. It was not unusual for pressure in the bottles to cause "spontaneous explosions". Workers in the cellars wore protective masks similar to catcher's masks. Critics of the new sparkling wines called it 'The Devils Wine'.


Champagne
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal


Beef Tagine with Brussels SproutsThe other day Rick and I were listening to Jim Rome on the radio and they were playing a tape of a woman who called 911 because her 12 year old daughter was out of control and beating up her 14-year-old sister.

I thought sister's fight all the time? Any way, our ancestors didn't call 911 on their brats, no, they chewed Turmeric root then spit it in their faces.

You see; Turmeric scares away demons. On the radio the dispatch operator asked the mother if she would like him to come over and shoot the wild child. Apparently the dispatcher lost his job.

Shamans in some of the pacific islands use Turmeric as an amulet protect them from ghosts and sorcerers; they chew the root of the plant and spit them over a person possessed by demons. In Sumatra midwives would chew Turmeric and then spit it out on newborn infants as protection from witches and demons. In southern India the powder is poured on graves in death rites. Turmeric is supposed to please the ancestral spirits as well as repel the underworld forces.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Alligator Pears

I love to be all cozy and warm on stormy days like today. The wind pummels the world outside while the fire cracks and pops. It's just lovely.

The distant sound of a football game in the other room reminds me of the super bowls ever looming presence, I need to begin to plan Rick's superbowl feast. Each year I try to find new and exciting snacks to increase his big game pleasure. The cheapest easiest stuff will be just fine, so I always make guacamole. He loves it and what could be easier than smashing ripe succulent avocados.

avacado dishThe avocado goes well with football as it is a manly fruit, its Aztec name ahuacate, means testicle. Long ago the avocado had a reputation for inducing sexual prowess and had to be eaten and purchased in secret. Avocados could destroy ones reputation. The avocado originated in Mexico. What a surprise! Ancient pottery depicting pictures of avocados has been found in Mexico dating from 8000 to 7000 BC. Pre-Columbian Americans held the avocado in high esteem and used the oil to anoint during religious ceremonies. They called it the alligator pear because of its rough skin.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

A Silver Lining In A Dark Cloud

By now everyone; sports fans, non-sports fans, animal lovers, children and teenagers alike know about the fall of former Atlanta Flacons Quarterback Michael Vick. The sheer magnitude of the money he’s going to lose as well as the Atlanta franchise and Home Depot co-founder Arthur Blank, is close to unbelievable. Personally Vick is going to be out a rumored 150 Million dollars based on lost endorsements, contractual bonus, performance money and a variety of other incomplete contractual obligations.

Don’t expect much sympathy for Vick, the crime which he committed and is now spending time behind bars for is reprehensible, disgusting and sicking. His case was a "perfect storm"; a crime that people especially in America abhor; a federal agency looking into gambling and animal trafficking and finding it, and then major animal rights groups protesting it, causing all of them to converge on a person who was nationally known and very high profile. Once the scent of guilt was there they pounced. Arrests and indictments were swiftly implemented and the media reverberated with the story in full detail. Again it is an almost unbelievable drama played out right before our eyes with famous person finally going to jail.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Hold on I'm Coming

Hold on I’m coming was what the storm of December 2007 was saying and people were listening. All the weather services and media predicted a big one triggering memories of the famous Columbus Day storm of 1962 and the winds and flooding of 1995/6. So as the timeline approached the word "hunker down" became appropriate.

We first got word of the impending storm from Amanda the barista at the "Village Bean". She had been informed by Katie the local baker who makes breads and pastries for the markets and coffee shops. That got me looking and the Oregonian had a great several day outlook complete with images of the swirling air masses rapidly approaching one another and then us.

By then the radio and television stations were on it so as the day approached we were up to speed. Fortunately my supplies were in order, food and water on hand so I settled into the task of writing my column and a couple of articles for the paper. I got to watch a great Civil War football game between the Ducks and Beavers and listened to the winds picking up and the rain falling harder. But it was cozy, we had a fire going and my girlfriend, a food writer, was researching a holiday drink called "Glug". A centuries old tasty combination of wine, cloves, oranges, and lemons heated over a flame. The result is supposed to be an anomic warming winter drink.

We’ve lived here a long time and have weathered a lot of storms and with the exception of not having a portable power generator I figured we were ready for this one.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Three Wise Men

I stumble upon many fascinating discoveries in my research and I am very happy to share this story with you. How wonderful to find a story of Christ's birth that I'll bet few have heard. Frankincense and Myrrh are well known to everyone familiar with the story of Jesus, as two of the three gifts brought to the newborn King by three wise men. Marco Polo was pleased to have discovered in Persia new information on the legend, of the three wise men.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Christmas TreeO Christmas tree, O Christmas Tree,
What happiness befalls me;
When oft at
Joyous Christmas time,
Your form inspires my
Song and rhyme.

I love Christmas, and I especially love decorating. We have two potted Norfolk Island pines that we have had for years. Rick leaves his decorated all year! I like having live potted trees, I think Arbor Day and Christmas should be combined, that way we can plant our little trees out in our yards and watch them grow, just a thought.

Today I'll discuss evergreens in general and pine trees in particular. After all, since this is a food column I do plan to discuss that tasty little pine nut.


Merry Christmas
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal
Still a Good Dog!

I played in a band called Good Dog and to this day we former Dogs still bark at one another whenever we get the chance. It was a great experience being a Dog and I was recently reminded that being a Dog helps! In my case I'm dealing with an arthritic hip that's seen better days and have been going through the endless process of scheduling a total hip replacement. In this day and age shoulders, elbows, knees and other moving parts are being replaced in record numbers.

There are a plethora of specialists and the benefits of no pain and new or restored movement make replacement quite desirable so I set out on my journey to join the ambulatory population. At first I tried the Veterans Hospital but was given the news that there is a long waiting list and my priority as a Vet is rather low compared to the Vets returning from the current wars so I was advised to seek another path if possible. At that point I began to feel like a Dog, but not a Good Dog, but a Dog without a home!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick
Time

After watching the college football bowl marathon I came away with memories of time in college. Since a lot of these bowls have been played for years there were a lot of references to the different years big events happened. I remembered that forty years ago this February when I was in college there was a big event in my life and forty years later it's come to life again.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

PeasIt was a dark and stormy night, Rick and I were becoming restless, and we needed something warm and comforting to get us through those drab winter night, nights that begin at three in the afternoon. After a moments thought we remembered what there is only one thing than can transform a day like this into a warm and cozy one, and that is a big bowl of steaming hot split pea soup..

Peas have been harvested worldwide since the Neolithic age.

People of Europe connected peas, beans and legumes with the underworld. People would place peas in coffins in honor of the dead, a tradition that survives today. Peas are also served in western Europe on all saints day, a Catholic holiday commemorating all the souls who have departed this world and gone on to the otherworld. The Europeans called peas "soul food," and would serve it to the poor.

All Souls day was originally a Celtic festival in which the living served food to the dead, believing that on this day the dead returned to earth to be fed. It was believed these returning souls could be dangerous and they were feared, therefore great lengths were taken to "appease" them.


The Mighty Pea
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal


So Soon?

 I had hardly put the leftover Halloween trick or treat candy away when I heard a commercial from one of the "big box retail" stores about a "Pre Black Friday" Christmas sale beginning Nov 2'nd!

Now that's moving the Christmas shopping season up a bit! Traditionally "Black Friday" has been the first shopping day after Thanksgiving since the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1924. The term "Black Friday" has been traced back only to 1970 and was called that because of the heavy traffic on that day, although most contemporary uses of the term refer instead to it as the beginning of the period in which retailers are in the black from turning a profit. Actually, the busiest retail shopping day of the year in the US in terms of both sales and customer traffic is usually the Saturday before Christmas.

Now that makes sense to me, but I'm a last minute shopper anyway and that's because besides being not much of a shopper if I want to get the full blast of the holiday season no better way that to fight through hordes of shoppers all looking for that "right" something and facing the reality that the good stuff is gone so you'll probably end up with a unique, one of a kind, rare gift. But like they say "It's the thought that counts"!

But getting back to the pre "Black Friday" sales, not all the big guys are holding them but there have been complaints from merchants not doing them about the ones that are. It seems a bit sacrilegious to completely shove Thanksgiving out of the way and just focusing in on Christmas but there is logic to it from the retail aspect. For example most of the items offered in the first pre- Black Friday sales were electronics and popular toys. These are the cash "now" type items, young people want the latest gadgets "now" and toys are always popular as any parent would know.

So get those "now" gifts at great prices and your holiday season can be a fun time without the stress of having to shop anymore. Some of the big Malls in the country are pushing sales "now" with appearances by Santa's and other Christmas icons saying "come in now and get it done in November and enjoy December!"

They are suggesting you'll save time and cash by shopping now where parking won't be a hassle and you'll have a full inventory to choose from. But we all know what the bottom line is here; retailers hope to spur domestic growth which recently has been flat, and its customers have been faced with higher energy prices and a rocky economy.

I guess I'm just a touch old fashion and while I can relate to the retailers mentality I would really like to suggest that we don't forget Thanksgiving in the holiday madness and remember that Thanksgiving Day is a day to give thanks and share the things we have at the end of the harvest season!

To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Bowl of BeansThere was a time when women ruled the world. Men were considered to be good for a short list of necessities and were basically for entertainment purposes only. The reasons for this had to do with the fact that a woman"s 28-day cycle coincided with the 28-day cycle of the moon and there were 13 months.

It was believed the only way a woman became pregnant was by the wind or by eating beans. Therefore, men had little importance in the area of reproduction. For thousands of years in virtually every civilization it has been taught that the soul is as the bible references it, “but a vapor. Or as Pythagoreans believed the soul or spirit is made of wind.

The Greek word for soul is ‘anemos, which means wind. Pythogoras was a Greek philosopher and founder of a religious cult in which he taught his followers vegetarianism sexual equality, reincarnation and that the eating of beans is not only forbidden but also punishable by death. He believed that man and beans emerged from the identical primordial slime, therefor, the eating of beans was equal to cannibalism.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Mushrooms are mysterious; they sprout from the ground instantly and hide in shady places. They sit quietly under leaves or plants and spy on us. One of the oldest explanations for the origin of mushrooms identifies them as fairy rings. The fungus often form circles around the base of trees. It is said that fairies dance around the base of trees and mushrooms spring up where their feet touch the ground. They say Fairies capture those who wonder inside the magic circles where they dance.

These strange mushroom formations fired the imaginations of people who also connected them with witches and demons. Some referred to them as "devil's bread"or "devil's food"and others believed they grew from the spittle of witches or sorcerers. Mushrooms often sprang up after storms leading to the Greek belief that mushrooms were caused by lightning. They believed that a bolt from the great Zeus created the fungi. The fly agaric mushroom, a poisonous species grew abundantly in north and Central America, shamans used them to induce trances. Shamanic cultures of the northern lands believed that supernatural beings inhabited mushrooms; the Koryak of Siberia believed that evil beings called nimvits inhabited them and that only shamans could control these beings.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Whats up Doc?

CarrotsWhen I think of carrots I automatically think of Bugs Bunny, he and Mr. Spock on Star Trek were my idols as a child. In fact I consider myself to be sort of a warped cross between the two.

I remember Bugs always had a great time outsmarting Elmer Fudd, and he always had a carrot. All animals seem to know instinctively what their bodies need to heal sickness and nourish.

A monkey will run around collecting just the right combination of plants to cure illness and eliminate parasites. If you have watched a dog chew grass it is not because the dog is hungry, she probably has a stomach ache and this is how they clean their teeth.

With Easter right around the corner we all hope the Easter Bunny will find us. They are a root vegetable and so are believed to have connections to the powers under the earth. Root vegetables in Buddhist myth embraced the belief that body parts of humans or animals after death are transformed into plants, conveying the ancient belief that all life including plants have souls.

This is an example of a progression in thought:

Patient "I am sick".


Carrots through History
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

OrnamentsHoliday Traditions 101

I have always been fascinated by all of the Christmas traditions. As a child the one tradition we had was that of erecting our silver metal tree with the beautiful color wheel, it’s red, it's green it's yellow; and round and round it would go. My only exposure to the Yule or the mistletoe or green and red was at school or a friend's house. As a child I always wondered what a Yule log has to do with the birth of Jesus.

"The Yule"

Seasons GreetingsThe Yule log is the most universal of all Christmas symbols; it's origin is an ancient tradition that began in northern Europe at the time of the winter solstice, which has always been December 25th. These festivals were dedicated to the two most prominent gods; Mithra, the Persian sun god, and god of death, and Odin, or (Jolnir, the name eventually evolved to Yule), the Scandinavian god of intoxicating drinks, ecstasy and death.


Holiday Traditions 101
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Salmon Cakes If you talk to the animals.....

They will talk to you, and you will know each other.....If you do not talk to them, You will not know them, and.....What you do not know you will fear......

"What one fears one destroys. “Chief Dan George

Today, (October 4th) I had the privilege of attending the beautiful celebration of the feast of St. Francis of Assisi. St. Francis the patron saint of animals, he lived in Assisi Italy in the late 12th century. This day is a special day set aside to bless all animals. Animals can teach us many lessons if we pay attention, they teach us loyalty, compassion and the true definition of unconditional love.


Salmon Moon
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

The month of October can be a scary time of year!

You know October is a scary month with Halloween being the official scary day featuring ghosts and goblins witches and things that go bump in the night, scary stuff for sure!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Jack-O-LanternThe tradition of carving toothy grins on pumpkins began long ago. People believed that if they carved a scary face on a gourd, pumpkin or even a turnip they would be protected from dangerous supernatural beings. Back in the dark times of Europe many tales were told in autumn about October 31st. As this was the day the spirits roamed the earth, special precautions were taken, and the Jack-O-Lantern was one of them. There is an Old Irish legend about a man named Stingy Jack, who was too mean to go to heaven, had played so many tricks on the devil he couldn't go to hell. When he died he had to walk the earth carrying a turnip with a burning coal in it. Stingy Jack became known as "Jack of the lantern" or "Jack-o-lantern".


Jack-O-Lantern - Halloween
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Stalling

Well the official definition of Procrastination is a type of "avoidance behavior" which is characterized by "deferment of actions of tasks to a later time". Psychologists often cite procrastination as a mechanism for "coping with the anxiety associated with starting or completing any task or decision."

Now that's a nice way of saying procrastination means not doing what you're supposed to be doing because you're stalling or waiting for the right moment to get going. Nobody knows that better than a writer on a deadline! You've probably heard of "writers block", and whether or not there is really such a thing is debatable, but there are times when that blank page stays blank for a long time!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

What happened to the regulars?

When I say "regulars" I mean people you see all the time at a particular place. How well you know them varies but I always wonder just what happened to that "regular" that is no longer there! I wonder that when I pass a coffee shop, restaurant, market, ball field at a neighborhood park, transit stop or the neighborhood bar.

When you were a kid on summer vacation you had spots where you gathered all the time with others and like they used to say on Cheers; "everybody knew your name!" The end of summer often meant that by the time next summer rolled around many of the "regulars" who you probably knew well would be gone. They possibly could have moved, met new friends, found new places to hang out or simply got tired of the same old routine. Odds are some would disappear never to be heard from again!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

My entire life I have been baffled by the idea of an apple being the cause of mankind's fall from grace. This fruit is responsible for mankind being kicked out of paradise, and forced into slavery for eternity. It is difficult to fathom but the apple has an extensive mythological history.

It appears in myth, folklore and legends around the world. Apples are considered to be enchanted. They are supposed to be able to scream, shrivel in the presents of adulterers, grant immortality and is a means of divination. In Arabian myth, Prince Ahmed of the Arabian Nights had apples that cured any and all forms of illness or human malady. Medieval Celts in northern Europe revered apples; they believed apples possessed the power to enchant, mystify and grant wishes. The name apple is derived from Apollo the sun God.


Added 14 September, 2007 by Crystal
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

A Non-Human Slave

Slavery is a social economic system under which certain persons known as ‘slaves' are deprived of personal freedom and compelled to perform labor or services". Well that's the dictionary definition of a slave; but does it only apply to people?

For example, have you ever thought about how about an electric Public Address system feels, especially a portable one. Although it's not technically a "person" it does qualify as something personal to its owner. It's kind of like your car or guitar or piano or entertainment center. You take good care of it, better care than many "persons" get.


To reach Rick email: yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Turnips

The Great Turnip of Happiness

Have you ever seen some one wandering aimlessly down the street and said to yourself, "Self, I think that guy looks like he just fell off a turnip truck"! Rick swears I fell off a turnip truck and I know he did!

So what exactly does this mean you ask? This is an expression made popular by the famous late night talk show host, Johnny Carson. It was a term a con artists used when referring to a new guy in town. He was a hayseed who would believe anything he was told. This person isn't just dumb enough to be on a turnip truck; he's so dumb he fell off. Anyway, this week's subject is, Can you guess?

Turnips surprised me, I had no idea there could be anything interesting about a turnip. Nothing is really boring in the world of plants, all have been given a reason that they exist, and all things were mysterious to the people of the ancient world. All things were precious, all things revered.


The Great Turnip of Happiness
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Yachats BeachHere on the Central Coast there are a few villages, small towns, and a couple of bigger cities like Florence and Newport. I speak to folks all the time about where they live, or where they are from, and they always mention how much they like visiting our neck of the woods.

They often call it "Paradise" and how great it would be to live here. One village that is mentioned a lot is Yachats, so let's see what it's like in that little slice of Paradise.

ParadiseKnown as the Gem of The Oregon Coast, Yachats is a destination place for visitors from all over the world. The phrase another day in paradise is frequently heard and anyone who has been in Yachats on a beautiful day will likely agree. The small village has many wonderful accommodations, restaurants, shops and stores which enhance livability and natures blessings make it a beautiful setting. Indeed, reviews by both national and international media have placed Yachats on many "must visit" lists.


Living and Working in Paradise
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Rick SchultzeThe sun is shinning brightly and the beach is populated with people enjoying themselves frolicking across the sand to dip in the cool Pacific Ocean, digging in the sand and making sand castles, and generally having a blast. Nothing quite like days at the beach with nothing to worry about except getting sunburned! All this activity certainly helps work up appetites and the local eateries are prepared to satisfy the ravenous population.


Added 29 August, 2007
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Bob Serra

Siuslaw News editor moves on!

Bob Serra, the long time editor of the Siuslaw News, is moving on to a new venture. His loss will actually affect several newspapers including the South Lincoln County News in Waldport where I work; he was executive editor. The common thread....

Bob Serra

He also worked at those papers in a variety of capacities; reporter, editor, organizer, and mentor to many writers!

His replacement at Siuslaw News, Theresa Baer, has a strong background of over 20 years in the publishing business and will certainly do an outstanding job!


Bob Serra
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

"Chick Flicks" and "Stupid Movies"

What's the difference? Well, I guess it would depend on who you are talking to. For women there are classic "chick flicks" like Beaches, Fried Green Tomatos, Steel Magnolias, Divine Secrets of The Ya Ya Sisterhood and Pretty Woman, to mention a few. What many men like are often referred to as "stupid movies" like Strange Brew, Happy Gilmore, Tommy Boy, Caddyshack, and Austin Powers.

The obvious difference is the plot, the chick flicks have deep meaningful plots with many emotional twists and turns while the stupid movies usually have little plot, lots of slapstick type action, and possibly explosions and naked women cavorting around. And then there is the music from the movie soundtrack.


To reach Rick Schultze email: yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Chase is Over

There were a lot of things going through my mind as I watched Barry Bonds shatter the all time home run record with a 435 foot blast into the right center field seats.

Barry Bonds It was the end of an intense waiting game with the national media following Bonds every move and as interest peaked, so did the controversy. With the commissioner of Baseball tagging along for a few of the games a debate even arouse over whether or not the commissioner was obligated to be in attendance. Of course that debate will rage on in baseball purists' minds and draw scoffs by those who frankly don't give a damn!


To reach Rick Schultze email -- yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Re-charging - Into the Valley

One of the greatest things about living on the coast is that you can often find a beach or hiking trail to explore without seeing another soul! This serenity and quiet is appreciated by folks that deal with people on the job, at the markets, on the highways, and in the busy restaurants especially in the summer months. With that quiet time you can de-compress and recharge your batteries and jump right back into the thick of things with renewed energy.

However, another way to recharge your batteries is to zip over the hill to what Coastal Dwellers refer to as The Valley! My girlfriend and I recently had the opportunity to go to the valley to see a professional baseball game and do a bit of country boy sightseeing. When I say country boy sightseeing I mean when you find yourself staring at tall structures and busy streets like you've never seen anything like that before!


Added 01 August, 2007 by Rick
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Re-charging - Into the Valley

One of the greatest things about living on the coast is that you can often find a beach or hiking trail to explore without seeing another soul! This serenity and quiet is appreciated by folks that deal with people on the job, at the markets, on the highways, and in the busy restaurants especially in the summer months. With that quiet time you can de-compress and recharge your batteries and jump right back into the thick of things with renewed energy.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

A breath of fresh air

The other day my pals Jersey Jerry and Jungle George and I got together for our annual summer world summit meeting at our favorite gathering spot and we got down to business. Jersey, a long time five star chef, was mad about the cost of food going up due to transportation costs and Jungle, a retired large cat trainer from the circus, was equally upset about the recent recalled cat food fiasco.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Cherries are my favorite fruit; they are so plump, sweet and juicy. I am always reminded of the old days when I lived in Ashland Oregon. There were two cherry trees on the campus of Southern Oregon State College. My daughters were children then and picking these cherries had become an annual event.

CherriesWe walked by and checked on their ripeness every day. On the days we picked them we'd have picnics, climb the trees then go swimming at the lake. I cherish the memories of those hot Ashland summer days, when it was just the three of us, my little girls and I.

Cherry trees played a large role in ancient legend, myth and folklore. The Chinese believed the tree-bestowed fertility and immortality. In one myth the goddess His Wang Mu had a garden in which the cherries of immortality ripened every 3000 years, the gods would eat them in order to remain immortal.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

They are both males, one is 19 years old, the other a 69, one just completed his freshman year in college, the other one just helped complete two college projects. Well, they both have college connections but what they really have in common is the influence they have in Oregon. One is a major benefactor to Oregon institutions, the other; the predicted savior for a team and its attempt to regain local and national prominence.

What do these two have in common? The attention of Oregon Sports Fans!

Oregon is a state that takes sports seriously and Oregonians put their hearts into their teams. Here on the coast in the past couple of years Newport, Waldport, Mapleton, and Florence all have had teams that have reached great heights and championships. It's great to see and feel the enthusiasm when the home team is on top.

With that in mind let me tell you what these two have in common. There is a list of the top 25 Most Influential People in Oregon Sports. There are some heavy hitters on that list including Governor Ted Kulongoski, Paul Allen and Jennie Logsdon who maintains the outdoor-related Web site www.ifish.net which informs anglers and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

So the common thread is that Greg Oden, a 19yr old basketball player from Ohio State University who was considered to be the best collegiate basketball player this year and was and drafted number one by the Portland Trailblazers in the National Basketball Associations lottery draft, and the 69yr old founder of Nike; Phil Knight, are number one and two on that Influential People list. They are the top of the top five and that's no small feat. Of course Oden has to become what the Trailblazers need. A big, talented athlete with a lifestyle that promotes positive things, something the Trailblazers need after several years of less than complementary actions by some of their players. Knight on the other hand owns a proven commodity and is often referred to as "Uncle Phil" because of his monetary donations. He has his share of detractors but like he says, "When you get to where we are today, Nike, people are going to take shots at you". However, his loyalty to Oregon is unparalleled.

So both these guys are under the bright lights and can't escape that, but another thing they have in common is that they are both willing and able to step up to the plate and give it all they have and from this vantage point I'd say they will continue to have the attention of Oregon sports fans!

Added 13 July, 2007 by Rick


To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net.
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

TeaYou can taste and feel, but not describe the exquisite state of response produced by tea; that precious drink which drives away the five causes of sorrow.

According to Chinese legend the mythical Emperor Shen-Nung in around 2500 BC accidentally discovered tea when the wind blew some tealeaves into a pot of water he was boiling to drink. The Emperor liked the flavor of these boiled leaves and tea as a drink was born.Tea did not become a common beverage until around 6oo AD.

Tea ceremonies began as a means of achieving spiritual enlightenment, Buddhist priests in Japan considered tea drinking a holy sacrament; therefore tea drinking was considered a religious act.


Food through History
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal


Behind the Festivities on the 4th of July...

Well, it's 4th of July time and towns and villages up and down the Oregon Coast are gearing up for the celebrations; the parades with dignitaries and regular folks riding in everything from restored hotrods and fancy convertibles to tractor towed manure spreaders!

Storefronts and other businesses will be festooned with red, white, and blue bunting and flags will be flying. The nighttime skies will explode with colors, smoke trails, and sounds as you hear people marveling at the aerial pyrotechnics. It's a fun time and these towns and villages open their arms to welcome visitors and show them a great time on the magnificent Oregon Coast!

However, in one village, behind the festivities and the smiling faces, a battle is heating up. It began with a proposed tax on prepared foods and concerned citizens drew up a petition to force an election. The tax passed despite protests and there are some that felt wronged and cited a variety of reasons. But it will become law July 1st and people are abiding by it. However one business, lets call it a beautiful rose, revered by many, has an angry thorn; the owner. That is a problem for employees of that business, the twins, spike and the others who are suffering from the backlash of his erratic and juvenile protesting and verbal outbursts in public. Plus a big problem the thorn has is that his outbursts directed towards the city are affecting people who have absolutely nothing to do with his complaints; the office staff that must endue conscious attempts to disrupt their normal tasks and the elected officials who feel threatened by his actions.

Nope, this isn't a happy situation, yet many of the players in this mini drama will be on hand on the 4th of July smiling and welcoming visitors and locals alike with the warmth and hospitality the village is deservedly well known for! For the moment, the battle will definitely be behind the festivities!

But back to the festivities; enjoy all of them and there are many, and have a safe and fun filled 4th of July on the magnificent Oregon Coast!

To reach Rick Schultze; email yarick@pioneer.net


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

With the Oregon State Baseball team advancing to the College World Series it reminds me of the time another baseball team from Oregon made it to a world series!

That wasn't an everyday occurrence around here back then, or now, although The Oregon State Baseball team is the defending Collegiate Champion; but generally when baseball people talk, Oregon isn't mentioned like California, Arizona, Florida, or Texas are. However, Oregon State is established as a major Collegiate force in the sport, but the Beavers home, Corvallis, isn't one of the best known cities in the country nor was the city of the other Oregon team to get into the World Series; Roseburg!

It was fifty years ago this year that the mighty Roseburg American Legion baseball team, Post #16, sponsored by Lockwood Motors, and called the “Douglas County Wonder Kids'; made it to Bismarck, North Dakota for the series.

I remember it well because we were camping at South Twin Lake and could only catch the game on radio. Our problem was our car radio wasn't very strong so we had to go into La Pine to get decent reception. Once we found out when the first game was we loaded up the car and went to La Pine, found a little restaurant that had the game on and ate and listened.

It was fun, not exactly camping and fishing, but it was exciting. We were from Roseburg and it was our team! Well, today watching Oregon State on TV on ESPN, I felt the same sort of "our team" spirit. Like the Roseburg team, the Beavers have the attention of a lot of people who don't even know where they are from. But like the Roseburg team I could only imagine as I listened to the crackling radio, the Beaver team I watched on a brilliant television was giving it all they had.

I'm proud of the Roseburg team from 50 years ago and the Beavers of today! Way to represent Oregon!

To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net



Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Have you heard the word "Whale" a lot lately?

humphrey the humpbackLiving here on the coast people are always mentioning that they saw a whale, or thought they saw one, leisurely making their way north from Mexico to Alaska or back south to Mexico depending upon the time of year. They are spectacular mammals who easily capture the interest of those who see them. Recently two whales nicknamed 'Delta and Dawn' made the national news when they ventured from the Pacific Ocean into the deep water channel which leads inland for about 90 miles to West Sacramento Calif. They spent about two weeks there but yesterday they swam back to the Ocean.

In 1985 another whale nicknamed Humphrey also strayed from his normal route and ended up in Rio Vista California about 69 miles inland, a bit south of West Sacramento. Then amazingly enough he appeared again in 1990 meandering around the San Francisco Bay. All three of those whales became instant celebrities for their antics and I happened to be dreaming about those whales when I was awakened by a early morning phone call Sunday to get to Seal Rock just North of Waldport and get photos of a beached whale. My first waking thought was 'poor whale, something happened.' My second thought was 'oh no, I hope they aren't going to try what they did in the 1970 debacle near Florence when they unsuccessfully tried to blow up a beached whale and ended up with a blubber shower!' Then I began to think clearer and remembered that in 1979 a pod of whales beached themselves near the same place but were buried.


To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The Race!

Horse racing is called the Sport of Kings and for good reason, if you own a good enough racehorses you have a chance to win the legendary Triple Crown, a fitting trophy for any King.

The Triple Crown consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses; The Kentucky Derby, The Preakness, and The Belmont Stakes. Winning all three of these races is considered the greatest accomplishment of thoroughbred horse racing. In recent years no one has won the Triple Crown; the last was Affirmed in 1978. Now for horse owners those statistics mean something; they might just have the next Triple Crown winner in their stable! But for horse racing fans who like to bet on the nags, those statistics make for lots of gambling because if one horse has a chance to win it all horse racing gamblers will lay large sums on the races. The more drama and intrigue, the more the betting. Heck for the last few years a major credit card company offered a five million dollar bonus to the horse that could win all three but couldn't get rid of it!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Rosemary is one of my favorite herbs. Unique among herbs, its musty scent immediately takes me to an old wooden back porch. The kind with ancient rotting wood slats, covered in wisteria. Maybe a wicker chair and a cat, lace curtains, etc. etc. Rosemary's history is actually quite nice, best known in superstition and legend as a symbol of remembrance, friendship and love.

In weddings the bride wore a wreath of woven rosemary dipped in scented water. At funerals mourners tossed a sprig of rosemary in the grave as a symbol that the lost would not be forgotten. Rosemary is a lovely wedding gift for the bride as it means the women will be the heads of the household. Greek Scholars taught their students to wear a garland of rosemary on their heads during exams to improve memory. For centuries people believed that a rosemary plant would never grow taller than 6 feet in 33 years so as not to be taller than Christ.


Rosemary - Food Through History
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

The official definition of Graduation is the action of receiving or conferring an academic degree or the associated ceremony that goes with it. You'd have to be living on the moon not to know it's Graduation time of year.

Schools from the hallowed halls of collegiate academia to Dottie's Day Care hold ceremonies and no doubt you know someone, or have a relative, or neighbor who's in one! It's a big deal and rightfully so, it signals an accomplishment of a mission; to finally get out!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

"She brought forth butter in a lordly dish," (Judges 5:25)

ButterThis passage was written 2000 years before Christ. Butter was discovered by accident. Theoretically when men checked their flasks of milk at the end of a bumpy journey they found a coagulated lumpy substance instead; butter. The word butter is originally from "bou-tyron" which means cow cheese in Greek.

The Greeks scoffed at butter eaters and believed them to be low class referring to these barbarians as "butterophagous gentry." The people of the south preferred olive oil to barbarous butter.

Mediterranean's believed butter caused leprosy, but the people in the north worshipped butter; it represented purity, innocence, mother, and wholesomeness. Butter stands alone and despite many tries can not be duplicated.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Have you heard the word "Whale" a lot lately?

Humphry the HumpbackLiving here on the coast people are always mentioning that they saw a whale, or thought they saw one, leisurely making their way north from Mexico to Alaska or back south to Mexico depending upon the time of year. They are spectacular mammals who easily capture the interest of those who see them. Recently two whales nicknamed 'Delta and Dawn' made the national news when they ventured from the Pacific Ocean into the deep water channel which leads inland for about 90 miles to West Sacramento Calif. They spent about two weeks there but yesterday they swam back to the Ocean.


Added 02 June, 2007 by Rick
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

The relationship between Love and chocolate is a bit shaky and there are plenty of myths about it! One myth about chocolates magic is in the history of Mesoamerica. The Aztecs and Mayans inherited cacao from the Olmecs who had discovered it around 1500 BC. Aztecs associated cacao with their God of fertility while the Mayans with their Goddess of fertility. The Mayans also connected cacao with a male deity they knew as Seven Flower, and the Aztecs with his equivalent, Xochipilli, these two Gods controlled stimulants and hallucinogens.

The Sweetest Seduction

Cacao beans grow inside of a large pod, on the side of cacao tree. The beans are harvested, fermented, roasted and ground and mixed with a variety of different ingredients, chilis, cinnamon ground flowers, honey, or anise. In 1590 Jose de Acosta observed, Spanish men, and women were addicted to it. European women living in the new world loved drinking chocolate during mass, but when the local bishop realized this he condemned it as a "damned agent from the witches brew," and he threw the evil cacao drinkers out of church causing a sword fight to break out. Later the priest was mysteriously poisoned.


Added 24 May, 2007 by Crystal
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

HOT PEPPERSOnce upon a time, I lived in a beautiful house in the woods outside of Talent Oregon, with four guys. We were Snow Red and the four dwarves. One night I decided to cook everyone patty melts, I knew men like hot sauce, so I found some and "dumped"it on.

A few bites later the guys were trying to say the words "HOT", but they couldn't talk. Finally Tyler, with a look of horror on his face grabbed a small bottle and shook it in my face," thi???" He tried to say. Turns out that "Dave's Insanity Sauce" is the hottest hot sauce in the Universe. Thanks to the huge stockpile of beer there were no casualties. This was my introduction to the diverse world of chili peppers. Humans have been perpetuating this scenario for around 75,000 years.


Peppers are Great!
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Roller Coaster

Been on any wild rides? I'm sure we all have memories of wild rides and one of mine that comes to mind was back when Jantzen Beach in Portland was an amusement park.

It was a paradise for kids during the summer with rides, a huge swimming pool, a picnic area, a midway with carnival games of chance, and a magnificent giant wooden roller coaster. I didn't live to far from Jantzen Beach and everyday I'd go to the park and walk around watching all the action wishing I could ride the roller coaster. I'd stand transfixed as the loaded cars would rattle by on the narrow tracks climbing to the top then the air would be pierced with shrieks of fear and joy as they barreled downwards. I wanted to join them but the problem I had getting to ride was that I was too short to go on without an adult. I was an inch too short according to the measuring marker on the wall of the ticket both.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Roller Coaster

Been on any wild rides? I'm sure we all have memories of wild rides and one of mine that comes to mind was back when Jantzen Beach in Portland was an amusement park.

It was a paradise for kids during the summer with rides, a huge swimming pool, a picnic area, a midway with carnival games of chance, and a magnificent giant wooden roller coaster. I didn't live to far from Jantzen Beach and everyday I'd go to the park and walk around watching all the action wishing I could ride the roller coaster. I'd stand transfixed as the loaded cars would rattle by on the narrow tracks climbing to the top then the air would be pierced with shrieks of fear and joy as they barreled downwards. I wanted to join them but the problem I had getting to ride was that I was too short to go on without an adult. I was an inch too short according to the measuring marker on the wall of the ticket both.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

A Turkish Proverb says, "Coffee should be black as Hell, strong as death and sweet as Love."

First of all I do not define Coffee as food, however Coffee is the number one source of caffeine and is given credit for the age of enlightenment and waking mankind from a drunken stupor. The average Northern European, including children, drank beer for breakfast, ale for lunch, stout with dinner, and a few mugs in between.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Mans love affair with Wine has no beginning, and no end; it is the alpha and the omega of libations. Theories abound as to its origin, one that stands out is the story of an ancient group of nomads who stored grapes in barrels, one of the barrels of grapes became foamy and turned sour so it was determined that it was poison and was not to be touched.

A young girl who suffered horrible headaches decided to kill her self and drank of the poison grapes. But Loa and behold, instead of dying she felt great, her headache was gone and she danced and laughed. Her family was amazed and also drank some and they too felt joyous and happy.


Added 18 May, 2007 by Crystal
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Gotta have it!

Well the official definition of Insurance is: The equitable transfer of the risk of a potential loss from one entity to another in exchange for a premium.


Of course we all know that means you have to pay a premium for insurance and hope you never have to use that insurance for an accident or disaster! It's a nifty form of gambling on the insurance company's part, they are betting that you will pay premiums for a long time and never have any reason to have to have them pay for anything. Auto insurance is the most widely used form of insurance with over near 200 million cars insured nationally and in Oregon 3 million of us have it.


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

Mustard - Food Through History

mustardThe first things I think of when I think of mustard is hotdogs and baseball, but our ancestors thought of some rather strange things. Scandinavians believed that a mixture of ginger, mustard seeds and spearmint would cure women of being frigid. In India and Denmark, the seeds were believed to posses magical powers, seeds were scattered on floors to keep out evil spirits.

Young German brides would sew the seeds into the hem of their wedding gowns; this would ensure they would be the dominant one in their marriage. In one Hindu legend from the book "Nectar and Ambrosia" by Tamra Andrews, a Brahman had a young wife who became a witch and betrayed her husband by having an affair with one of his herdsmen. When the Brahman found his wife with this man together he nearly killed them; his wife stopped him by turning him into a buffalo. The wife then sold him to a buffalo trader.


Mustard Greens
Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Continue to just believe.

Quite few years ago when I was in a rock and roll band with five guys and a girl the only thing we really had going for us was that we could play pretty good, were energetic, unafraid of going on the road and totally believed we'd be discovered. We bounced all over the country and while we were never discovered, we all survived. No small feat in those days!

That part of my life is just a memory these days but this afternoon in the parking lot of the Village Market it came back to me big time. As I sat in my car listening to Jim Rome on sports talk radio and waiting for my girlfriend to finish shopping I noticed a young woman timidly approaching some of the folks leaving the store. She was holding a compact disk and showing it to the people she was talking to. Finally the people she was talking to left and she saw me and walked slowly towards my car. I watched her coming and rolled down the window.


To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

While driving to Salem and back last week we noticed the plum trees are in bloom. Their delicate pink blossoms reminded me of the tree in my yard in Medford where I grew up. The plum tree is always the first to bloom so in honor of a most welcomed spring; I've chosen Plums this week.

Plums are in many of the ancient myths of China and Japan, one of which is a tale about a Dragon. In this story a dragons ears were cut off as punishment, and when the blood soaked into the earth a Plum tree grew. Plums appear in several Chinese and Japanese myths. Plum trees were considered to be one of the "five renowned fruits of antiquity," the other four are peaches, apricots, jujubes and the chestnut.


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

How the same two words can mean such different things to people!

Sure, "all alone" can mean being lonely or longing to be with others and is a sad feeling of being left alone or it can be "all alone" yeah!

Now I can watch the big game in peace and quiet or I can trim my toenails without someone staring at me!

How about "a vacation"? It could mean time taken off to finish painting your house or taking care of someone for a short period of time, or it can mean living it up on the brilliant white beaches of a Caribbean island. However, recently I was struck by two words that really mean something different to many males; "The Draft".


To reach Rick Schultze email yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

There are lots of legends and myths about Garlic like the one that when Satan fled the Garden of Eden....

Garlic sprang from his left footprint and onions from his right. The Gods Love wine and cheese and many other delicacies but what they have no tolerance for is bad breath, Garlic breath that is. Three thousand years ago in the Arabian town of Mar'ib, the Moon Goddess cursed two men with a horrible disease for committing the unforgivable sin of having "prayed in her temple after eating a meal of stinking plants and onions." By stinking plant she meant garlic.

 


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

Ice Cream - Chilling Screams!

I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream! These calls were first heard in New York City in the mid 1700s. Italian immigrants yelled I Scream, Ice Cream; in the streets as they peddled their hand cranked ice cream from their little pushcarts.

Our obsession with frozen treats began long ago. Solomon said, There is nothing new under the sun, and this is most certainly true of ice cream. Icehouses have been in use in Japan as far back as 1100 BC. Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC had ice and snow hauled down from the mountains and put in covered pits so he and his soldiers could enjoy cold wine while conquering the world. Nero, the roman emperor in the first century AD sent slaves to bring snow down from the mountains, and then he mixed fruit juice, pulp and honey to make a form of slush

 


Category: Food Through History
Posted by: Crystal

arthropodaWhen I say everyone I mean humans, fish, animals, birds and arthropoda !

It’s easy to see the humans moving about this time of year. Once the summer traffic on the coast; cars, campers, and small motor homes has moved on, the gigantic motor homes begin heading southward towards the sunshine. Vacation homes have been vacated and the summer residents return to their other homes. College students have returned to school and are filling up the college towns.

Apartment rentals are once again available in coastal villages with its summer time help migrating to better job markets. Fish, particularly salmon, are madly dashing up streams and rivers to return to their spawning grounds and as the mists and rains commence they hustle. Naturally that has the seals and sea lions moving as well!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Crystal

New Kid In Town

In most small towns when a new restaurant opens it's big news. Even the mention of one causes folks to talk. The village I live in has no chain restaurants probably because of it's size and possibly because of the village building policy, but the neighboring town north of me is on the verge of having two big chain outfits opening for business.

A major sandwich shop and pizza parlor will soon be providing goodies for the people who have been driving north or south 20 miles or more for those special meals they've seen advertised daily on TV or in the local newspaper. That will no doubt affect the established restaurants already there somewhat, but it will also benefit the local economy by providing new jobs. So it's a ying/yang situation, the Goliath's are moving in and possibly hurting the David's but the population in that town is growing so it probably will be a win/win situation all the way around with more choices locally and more money into the local economy.


To reach Rick Schultze by email: yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

A Wild Ride!

Road Rage I had an appointment in Salem the other day so I needed to make my way from the Coast over and back in a short afternoon because I had to cover a live event on the Coast that evening at the Event Center.

It's a beautiful drive eastward towards Corvallis on Highway 34; The Alsea Highway, and when I left there was light mist falling and the hills and forests were dotted with low gray wisps of clouds rolling with light winds and the occasional flash of the sun. It was a great time to sightsee and daydream in the solitude of the quiet of the hills.


Added 20 April, 2007 by Rick
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick

I had an appointment in Salem the other day so I needed to make my way from the Coast over and back in a short afternoon because I had to cover a live event on the Coast that evening at the Event Center.

Road RageIt's a beautiful drive eastward towards Corvallis on Highway 34; The Alsea Highway, and when I left there was light mist falling and the hills and forests were dotted with low gray wisps of clouds rolling with light winds and the occasional flash of the sun. It was a great time to sightsee and daydream in the solitude of the quiet of the hills.

However as I settled into a smooth scenic drive, the sky suddenly darkened and within seconds I was peering through a solid sheet of pelting rain so hard my windshield wipers were screaming for mercy. It was all I could do to see the road and I was in a narrow spot with no place to turn off and wait so it out so it was onward!


Added 20 April, 2007 by Rick
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Crystal

For a gyroscope to spin rapidly and keep its original plane of rotation it must be correctly balanced. A good one will spin for an amazingly long time.

Well musical groups are similar to gyroscopes in that they need balance to keep going which takes effort by all its members.

Rock bands don't have as many members as orchestras or marching bands do but to perform well all of them must play together in harmony. In the "big" time there are many more opportunities to rehearse, learn new material, and perform in great venues, but on the local level it's different so let's take a look and how the average rock band around here manages to spin effortsly like a balanced gyroscope.

I can tell you it isn't easy. There are so many factors that make it difficult that one wonders why people do it at all. Of course there is the musical drive that musicians have and it is a powerful drive, but coordinating the whole program takes some doing. Now I'm speaking about what could be called semi-pro bands. They probably won't be your next superstars, just working men and women. They are the kind that work here and there occasionally for small amounts of money. They work the lodges, bars, restaurants, parties, festivals and any other jobs they can get.


To reach Rick Schultze email contact yarick@pioneer.net.
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Crystal

Easter has different meanings; from the traditional religious view, to bunnies handing out colored Easter Eggs. However, it's safe to say that Easter is associated with Spring celebrations, feasts and gatherings. With that in mind let me give you a short Easter tale that has all the above!


To reach Rick Schultze by email: yarick@pioneer.net
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Crystal

Hi folks, we can have some fun with this so any input would be welcomed!

Rick.

Hey there is excitement in Florence tonight!

The Taste Of Home Cooking Show is going on at the Florence Events Center and I've been asked to take pictures! The way I see it is I'll be in an auditorium full of women who love to cook! How can ya beat that? The only drawback might be just getting pictures of the food and not being able to sample any! Nah! That won't happen!!!


Added 04 April, 2007
Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Crystal

Boy do we love our toys

Boy do we love our cars, trucks, and motorcycles!

A recent study indicates there are over 250 million passenger vehicles in the United States which is amazing given that the population of the country is estimated to be just over 300 million people! That means there are more vehicles than drivers!

That should say something about our love for vehicles, why have just one car or truck when you can have two? And if you're really into it you can get a vehicle and customize or restore it and just take it to auto shows and car club cruises. This month there is a huge auto show in Detroit, one in Portland and in February a hot rod show in Portland as well. The Internet is full of information about auto shows, autoramas, and other vehicle events nation wide. You could probably hit a show a week if you crisscrossed the country checking them all out!


Category: Ricks Yachats Blog
Posted by: Rick


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